ESPN Page 2's Super Bowl Team Rankings From #80-#1

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Page 2

<!-- hasAccess this is not a premium story -->After hours upon hours of exhaustive research, Page 2 is settling the debate once and for all with our definitive hierarchy of the first 80 Super Bowl participants.
OK, we admit it, we're just pouring more fuel on the fire. But what better football debate is there to have while we bide our time until this year's big game?
So seek out your favorite team on our list. We hope you'll be pleased with the result ? although we're reasonably certain you won't. If you're curious to know how we arrived at our rankings, and to read the top five lists from John Clayton and Len Pasquarelli, click here.
The rankings: No. 80 to No. 61 | No. 60 to No. 41 | No. 40 to No. 21 | No. 20 to No. 1

<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]80.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1979 LOS ANGELES RAMS 9-7 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>323</td> <td>20.2</td> <td>309</td> <td>19.3</td> <td>+14</td> <td>15 of 28</td> <td>13 of 28</td> <td>11 of 28</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>.473</td> <td>3-6</td> <td>49-50</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Pittsburgh 31-19 Coach: Ray Malavasi
Key players: QB Vince Ferragamo (5 TD, 10 INT in 110 PA), RB Wendell Tyler (1,109 yards), OT Jackie Slater, DE Jack Youngblood, LB Jack Reynolds, LB Jim Youngblood, C Rich Saul</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Rams were a powerhouse for most of the '70s under Chuck Knox and had six straight seasons of 10 or more wins from '73 to '78, so it was a surprise this 9-7 team was the one that finally reached the Super Bowl (with the worst record ever for a Super Bowl team). The Rams led the NFL in interceptions thrown in '79, with four different QBs contributing. Pat Haden was the starting QB most of the season, but Vince Ferragamo had replaced an injured Haden by the playoffs. Despite leading a superior Steelers team heading into the fourth quarter, this team still gets the No. 80 ranking.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]79.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2003 CAROLINA PANTHERS 11-5 (3-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>325</td> <td>20.3</td> <td>304</td> <td>19.0</td> <td>+21</td> <td>15 of 32</td> <td>16 of 32</td> <td>10 of 32</td> <td>7 of 32</td> <td>.445</td> <td>3-3</td> <td>101-68</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to New England 32-29 Coach: John Fox
Key players: QB Jake Delhomme (3,219 yards, 19 TD), RB Stephen Davis (1,444 yards), WR Steve Smith (88 rec, 1,110 yards), DT Kris Jenkins, DE Julius Peppers, DE Mike Rucker, S Mike Minter</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Don't be fooled by Carolina's near win in the Super Bowl. This was a .500 team masquerading as a playoff squad. The Panthers barely outscored their opponents during the regular season (seven of their 11 wins were by three points or less) despite a pretty easy schedule ? only six games against .500-or-better teams. While the defense was solid, especially in an NFC title win over Philly, they lost three straight games late in the season, the offense was mediocre, and just two players (Stephen Davis and Kris Jenkins) made the Pro Bowl. <table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]78.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2000 NEW YORK GIANTS 12-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>328</td> <td>20.5</td> <td>246</td> <td>15.4</td> <td>+82</td> <td>15 of 31</td> <td>13 of 31</td> <td>5 of 31</td> <td>5 of 31</td> <td>.445</td> <td>4-4</td> <td>68-44</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Baltimore 34-7 Coach: Jim Fassel
Key players: QB Kerry Collins (3,610 yards, 22 TD), RB Tiki Barber (over 1700 total yards), WR Amani Toomer, OG Ron Stone, DE Michael Strahan, LB Jessie Armstead, DT Keith Hamilton</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
A completely uninspiring and forgettable team, which got crushed in a completely uninspiring and forgettable Super Bowl. (Wait, Jim Fassel coached in a Super Bowl? Kerry Collins took every snap for a Super Bowl team?) Nonetheless, the Giants did win the NFC (beating the Vikings 41-0 in the NFC title game when Minnesota essentially quit). The Giants were strong on D, especially against the run (allowing just 3.2 yards per carry) and did beat the Eagles three times, but won a weak conference and lacked star power (only two Pro Bowlers). Did we mention Jim Fassel was the coach?
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]77.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1982 MIAMI DOLPHINS 7-2 (3-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>198</td> <td>22.0</td> <td>131</td> <td>14.6</td> <td>+67</td> <td>10 of 28</td> <td>19 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>.444</td> <td>3-2</td> <td>93-53</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Washington 27-17 Coach: Don Shula
Key players: QB David Woodley (63.5 passer rating), RB Andra Franklin, C Dwight Stephenson, OG Bob Kuechenberg, DT Bob Baumhower, DE Doug Betters, LB A.J. Duhe, CB Don McNeal</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Two words: David Woodley. Probably the worst QB ever to start a Super Bowl, Woodley went 4-for-14 in the loss. In the AFC Championship Game of this strike season, he threw three picks. The Dolphins beat the Jets 14-0 anyway (Richard Todd threw five picks). The Dolphins were 19th in total yards, making them one of the worst offensive teams to reach the Super Bowl. Notable fact: Miami allowed the fewest passing yards and had the most interceptions in the NFL, yet none of the defensive backs made the Pro Bowl. (Brothers Lyle and Glenn Blackwood started at safety and were known as the "Bruise Brothers.")
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]76.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1985 NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS 11-5 (3-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>362</td> <td>22.6</td> <td>290</td> <td>18.1</td> <td>+72</td> <td>10 of 28</td> <td>9 of 28</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>5 of 28</td> <td>.496</td> <td>4-5</td> <td>94-94</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Chicago 46-10 Coach: Raymond Berry
Key players: QB Tony Eason (11 TD, 17 INT, 67.5 QB rating), RB Craig James (1,227 yards), WR Irving Fryar, OG John Hannah, LB Andre Tippett, LB Steve Nelson, CB Fred Marion</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The good: a pretty strong defensive unit that featured four Pro Bowlers (remember how good Andre Tippett was?) and allowed the second-fewest TD passes and fifth-fewest yards in the NFL; Craig James and all-time great John Hannah gave the Pats a solid running game; three playoff wins on the road (at Jets, Raiders and Dolphins). The bad: QB Tony Eason had more picks than TDs (17 to 11). The ugly: that Super Bowl performance (Eason was benched for Steve Grogan after going 0-for-6 with a fumble and three sacks).<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]75.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1986 DENVER BRONCOS 11-5 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>378</td> <td>23.6</td> <td>327</td> <td>20.4</td> <td>+51</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>15 of 28</td> <td>15 of 28</td> <td>10 of 28</td> <td>.545</td> <td>7-4</td> <td>65-76</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to New York Giants 39-20 Coach: Dan Reeves
Key players: QB John Elway (3,485 yards, 19 TD), RB Sammy Winder (789 yards), WR Mark Jackson, DE Rulon Jones, LB Karl Mecklenburg, CB Mike Harden, S Dennis Smith</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
How did they reach Super Bowl with such mediocre team statistical rankings? Oh yeah, they beat a Marty Schottenheimer-coached team in the AFC title game. Before you make the case that this is the worst Super Bowl team, consider that Denver faced the toughest schedule ever of a Super Bowl participant ? .545 opponents' winning percentage. Oh, and they did have a guy named Elway playing quarterback.<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]74.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1996 NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS 11-5 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>418</td> <td>26.1</td> <td>313</td> <td>19.6</td> <td>+105</td> <td>2 of 30</td> <td>7 of 30</td> <td>14 of 30</td> <td>19 of 30</td> <td>.512</td> <td>4-5</td> <td>69-44</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Green Bay 35-21 Coach: Bill Parcells
Key players: QB Drew Bledsoe (4,086 yards, 27 TD), RB Curtis Martin (1,152 yards, 14 TD), WR Terry Glenn (90 rec, 1,132 yards), TE Ben Coates, OT Bruce Armstrong, DE Willie McGinest</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Bill Parcells likes to run the ball, but this was a throwing team: The Pats were second in the NFL in attempts and third in passing yards. That wasn't the only strange stat. While finishing second in points, the offense was more methodical than scary: 19th in yards per passing attempt and 25th in average yards per carry. And while the defense gave up a lot of yards (over 4,000 passing yards), it did have a tough run D (third-best yards per carry) and picked off 23 passes. But it certainly wasn't a great team and was helped when 9-7 Jacksonville knocked off 13-3 Denver in the divisional round.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]73.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1993 BUFFALO BILLS 12-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>329</td> <td>20.6</td> <td>242</td> <td>15.1</td> <td>+87</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>5 of 28</td> <td>27 of 28</td> <td>.500</td> <td>7-4</td> <td>72-66</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Dallas 30-13 Coach: Marv Levy
Key players: QB Jim Kelly (3,382 yards, 18 TD, 18 INT), RB Thurman Thomas (1,315 yards), WR Andre Reed, DE Bruce Smith, LB Cornelius Bennett, CB Nate Odomes, OT Howard Ballard</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Hey, only three more Bills teams to go! Despite a 12-4 record, this team had slipped substantially from previous years. Jim Kelly's passer rating declined for the third consecutive season, so the team relied heavily on Thurman Thomas. Buffalo went 7-4 against teams .500 or better during a difficult schedule and allowed the fifth-fewest points in the NFL, but one important statistic can't be ignored. Buffalo ranked next to last in yards allowed (and was outgained on the season by 294 yards). The Bills built a 13-6 halftime lead in the Super Bowl, a short-lived advantage as Dallas scored the last 24 points.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]72.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1999 TENNESSEE TITANS 13-3 (3-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>392</td> <td>24.5</td> <td>324</td> <td>20.3</td> <td>+68</td> <td>7 of 31</td> <td>13 of 31</td> <td>15 of 31</td> <td>17 of 31</td> <td>.461</td> <td>5-2</td> <td>90-69</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to St. Louis 23-16 Coach: Jeff Fisher
Key players: QB Steve McNair, QB Neil O'Donnell, RB Eddie George (1,304 yards, 13 TD), TE Frank Wycheck, OG Bruce Matthews, DE Jevon Kearse, S Blaine Bishop, CB Samari Rolle</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This team was defined more by grit, guts and a bit of a miracle than glamour and pizzazz. Despite its 13-3 record, there were some smoke and mirrors involved since the Titans barely outgained their opponents and didn't dominate any statistical category. They won the close games (one point over Cincy, one over Jacksonville, three other wins by three points) and owned Jacksonville, which lost three games all year ? all to the Titans, including the AFC Championship Game. And that miracle? The Titans used it up in the wild-card playoff victory over Buffalo and fell a yard short of tying the Super Bowl on the game's final play.<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]71.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1994 SAN DIEGO CHARGERS 11-5 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>381</td> <td>23.8</td> <td>306</td> <td>19.1</td> <td>+75</td> <td>5 of 28</td> <td>11 of 28</td> <td>9 of 28</td> <td>15 of 28</td> <td>.543</td> <td>4-3</td> <td>65-83</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to San Francisco 49-26 Coach: Bobby Ross
Key players: QB Stan Humphries (3,209 yards, 17 TD), RB Natrone Means (1,350 yards, 12 TD), WR Tony Martin, DE Leslie O'Neal, DE Chris Mims, LB Junior Seau, K John Carney</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This team takes its lumps because of the pummeling it took in the Super Bowl against one of the finest offenses ever assembled. The Chargers were the last undefeated team in the league at 6-0, and while their blue-collar offense boasted just one Pro Bowl player (Natrone Means), it ranked fifth in points scored. Stan Humphries navigated a balanced passing game that boasted four players with 40 or more receptions. San Diego won the AFC Championship Game at top-seeded Pittsburgh, and its only losses of more than seven points came against high-flying San Francisco in Week 14 and then in the Super Bowl.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]70.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1970 DALLAS COWBOYS 10-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>299</td> <td>21.4</td> <td>221</td> <td>15.8</td> <td>+78</td> <td>10 of 26</td> <td>4 of 26</td> <td>4 of 26</td> <td>4 of 26</td> <td>.487</td> <td>3-4</td> <td>35-26</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Baltimore 16-13 Coach: Tom Landry
Key players: QB Craig Morton (1,819 yards, 15 TD), RB Duane Thomas (803 yards), RB Calvin Hill, WR Bob Hayes, DT Bob Lilly, LB Chuck Howley, CB Mel Renfro, CB Herb Adderley</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This might seem like a low ranking for a team that lost the Super Bowl on a last-second field goal. But there are factors working against this squad. They went just 3-4 against teams .500 or better, including drubbings of 38-0 and 54-13. Their leading passer, Craig Morton, completed less than half his passes. Dallas had seven takeaways in the Super Bowl and still lost. Positively, rookie Duane Thomas bolstered the Cowboys' rushing attack and Bob Hayes averaged an incredible 26.1 yards per catch, as America watched a certain fedora-wearing coach begin to make his mark.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]69.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1988 CINCINNATI BENGALS 12-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>448</td> <td>28.0</td> <td>329</td> <td>20.6</td> <td>+119</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>17 of 28</td> <td>17 of 28</td> <td>.482</td> <td>5-3</td> <td>58-43</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to San Francisco 20-16 Coach: Sam Wyche
Key players: QB Boomer Esiason (3,572 yards, 28 TD), RB Ickey Woods (1,066 yards, 15 TD), RB James Brooks (931 yards), WR Eddie Brown (1,273 yards), OT Anthony Munoz, S David Fulcher</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
One of the forgotten offensive powerhouses, the Bengals led the NFL in rushing yards behind the dangerous 1-2 punch of Ickey Woods and James Brooks, and Boomer Esiason was the NFL MVP with a league-leading 97.4 QB rating. The other weapon was wide receiver Eddie Brown, who averaged an amazing 24 yards per catch. But this Bengals team had a split personality. They allowed the second-most points of any playoff teams, and while three of Cincinnati's four losses were by seven or fewer points, the fourth was a 35-point defeat at Houston with home-field advantage and the playoffs still at stake. Cincinnati also has the distinction of losing to the team with the most defeats of any Super Bowl champion.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]68.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1995 PITTSBURGH STEELERS 11-5 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>407</td> <td>25.4</td> <td>327</td> <td>20.4</td> <td>+80</td> <td>5 of 30</td> <td>6 of 30</td> <td>9 of 30</td> <td>3 of 30</td> <td>.495</td> <td>4-3</td> <td>77-64</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Dallas 27-17 Coach: Bill Cowher
Key players: QB Neil O'Donnell (2,970 yards, 17 TD), RB Erric Pegram (813 yards), WR Yancey Thigpen (1,307 yards), C Dermontti Dawson, LB Kevin Greene, LB Greg Lloyd, CB Rod Woodson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Pro: The Steelers had a fearsome defense that ranked second in the NFL in yards allowed. They had four defenders named to the Pro Bowl, including intimidators Greg Lloyd and Kevin Greene. Con: Their leading rusher was Erric Pegram, and they lost three games by 13 or more points. Pittsburgh outgained Dallas in the Super Bowl, but it couldn't overcome three Neil O'Donnell interceptions. To be fair, Pittsburgh faced a difficult schedule, but it also avoided the top-seeded team, Kansas City, in the AFC playoffs.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]67.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1966 KANSAS CITY CHIEFS 11-2-1 (1-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>448</td> <td>32.0</td> <td>276</td> <td>19.7</td> <td>+172</td> <td>1 of 9</td> <td>1 of 9</td> <td>2 of 9</td> <td>2 of 9</td> <td>n/a</td> <td>6-2-1</td> <td>41-42</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Green Bay 35-10 Coach: Hank Stram
Key players: QB Len Dawson (2,527 yards, 26 TD), RB Mike Garrett, WR Otis Taylor (1,224 yards), DE Buck Buchanan, DT Jerry Mays, LB Bobby Bell, LB E.J. Holub, DB Johnny Robinson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The AFL's best offense had good balance. Len Dawson compiled the second-best passer rating of his Hall of Fame career. Mike Garrett topped 800 rushing yards, and Curtis McClinton and Bert Coan added more than 500 apiece. Otis Taylor and Chris Burford combined for 116 receptions, 16 touchdowns and 2,055 receiving yards. The Chiefs had the No. 2 defense in the AFL, bolstered by future Hall of Famers Bobby Bell and Buck Buchanan. As the losing team in the first AFL-NFL championship game, the Chiefs earned player shares of $7,500 each.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]66.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1992 BUFFALO BILLS 11-5 (3-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>381</td> <td>23.8</td> <td>283</td> <td>17.7</td> <td>+98</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>13 of 28</td> <td>.492</td> <td>6-3</td> <td>111-103</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Dallas 52-17 Coach: Marv Levy
Key players: QB Jim Kelly (3,457 yards, 23 TD), RB Thurman Thomas (over 2,000 total yards), WR Andre Reed, OG Will Wolford, DE Bruce Smith, LB Cornelius Bennett, S Henry Jones</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
They're back! OK, let's say something nice here: The Bills had excellent rankings in the major categories, with the exception of 13th in yards allowed. Thurman Thomas had the highest rushing total of his career. And the Bills rallied behind backup QB Frank Reich to overcome a 32-point deficit against Houston in a classic playoff game and followed it up with two comfortable victories to win the AFC championship. Unfortunately, they did play the Super Bowl. Buffalo committed a record nine turnovers and, well, at least Don Beebe chased down Leon Lett. Not that that really salvaged any pride.<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]65.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1974 MINNESOTA VIKINGS 10-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>310</td> <td>22.1</td> <td>195</td> <td>13.9</td> <td>+115</td> <td>5 of 26</td> <td>3 of 26</td> <td>3 of 26</td> <td>10 of 26</td> <td>.454</td> <td>4-3</td> <td>50-40</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Pittsburgh 16-6 Coach: Bud Grant
Key players: QB Fran Tarkenton (2,598 yards, 17 TD), RB Chuck Foreman (777 yards, 15 TD), WR John Gilliam, OT Ron Yary, DT Alan Page, DE Carl Eller, S Paul Krause</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
And before the Bills there were the Minnesota Vikings! This was the third of Minnesota's four Super Bowl teams between 1969 and 1976 -- the Vikings would lose the four Super Bowls by a combined score of 95-34 and average just 237 yards per game (really, when you look back at the Super Bowls from the early '70s, you wonder how the game ever caught on). Anyway, this team lost by more than four points only once, but laid an egg in the Super Bowl, compiling a mere 119 net yards and scoring only on a blocked punt recovered in the end zone.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]64.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1987 DENVER BRONCOS 10-4-1 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>379</td> <td>29.3</td> <td>288</td> <td>19.2</td> <td>+91</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>9 of 28</td> <td>.464</td> <td>5-3</td> <td>82-85</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Washington 42-10 Coach: Dan Reeves
Key players: QB John Elway (3,198 yards, 19 TD), RB Sammy Winder, WR Vance Johnson, WR Ricky Nattiel, OL Keith Bishop, DE Rulon Jones, LB Karl Mecklenburg, CB Mike Harden</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Denver won its second consecutive AFC championship, but the Broncos' defense ultimately capsized. After allowing more than 30 points just once in 12 nonstrike games, Denver coughed up a combined 75 in the AFC Championship Game and the Super Bowl. A telling statistic was the 4.44 yards per carry that the Broncos allowed in the regular season, which ranked near the bottom of the league. Washington exploited that weakness to the tune of 280 rushing yards in a Super Bowl blowout.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]63.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1975 DALLAS COWBOYS 10-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>350</td> <td>25.0</td> <td>268</td> <td>19.1</td> <td>+82</td> <td>8 of 26</td> <td>3 of 26</td> <td>9 of 26</td> <td>5 of 26</td> <td>.459</td> <td>4-2</td> <td>71-42</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Pittsburgh 21-17 Coach: Tom Landry
Key players: QB Roger Staubach (2,666 yards, 17 TD), RB Robert Newhouse (930 yards), WR Drew Pearson, OT Rayfield Wright, DE Harvey Martin, LB Lee Roy Jordan, S Cliff Harris</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This team overachieved to reach the Super Bowl (only three Pro Bowlers), then suffered a narrow defeat against a powerful Steelers team. In the NFC Championship Game, the Cowboys earned a blowout 37-7 victory at Los Angeles against the league's stingiest scoring defense. Of course, if not for the controversial Hail Mary pass from Roger Staubach to Drew Pearson, this team wouldn't have beaten top-seeded Minnesota in the first round. Staubach didn't have one of his better seasons statistically (16 picks), and the Cowboys had the worst record among NFC playoff participants.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]62.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1981 CINCINNATI BENGALS 12-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>421</td> <td>26.3</td> <td>304</td> <td>19.0</td> <td>+117</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>12 of 28</td> <td>12 of 28</td> <td>.463</td> <td>6-1</td> <td>76-54</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to San Francisco 26-21 Coach: Forrest Gregg
Key players: QB Ken Anderson (3,754 yards, 29 TD), RB Pete Johnson (1,077 yards, 16 TD), WR Cris Collinsworth (1,009 yards), TE Dan Ross, OT Anthony Munoz, DE Ross Browner</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Bengals made a nice turnaround by doubling their win total from the previous season. Maybe it had something to do with the snazzy new uniforms the team introduced to replace the conservative attire the franchise had worn since its inaugural season in 1968. More likely, it involved the performances of Ken Anderson (98.4 QB rating, NFL MVP) and RB Pete Johnson, who both had career years. The Bengals held the NFL's highest-scoring team, the Chargers, to a single touchdown in the AFC Championship Game ? the coldest contest in league history at minus-9 degrees with a wind chill of minus-59.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]61.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1977 DENVER BRONCOS 12-2 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>274</td> <td>19.6</td> <td>148</td> <td>10.6</td> <td>+126</td> <td>10 of 28</td> <td>17 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>.520</td> <td>8-2</td> <td>64-65</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Dallas 27-10 Coach: Red Miller
Key players: QB Craig Morton (1,929 yards, 14 TD), DL Lyle Alzado, LB Randy Gradishar, LB Tom Jackson, CB Louis Wright, CB Billy Thompson, KR Rick Upchurch</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Although statistically unimpressive, the Broncos tied for the best record in the league against a difficult schedule. Denver had neither a 500-yard rusher nor a 30-catch wide receiver, but still went 8-2 against opponents .500 or better. These Broncos are the only Super Bowl participant to average less than 20 points per game. Craig Morton quarterbacked the team effectively, although he completed just 51.6 percent of his passes, but then chunked against his former team in the Super Bowl, throwing as many interceptions (four) as completions. <!---------------------INLINE TABLE (BEGIN)--------------------> <table id="inlinetable" target="new" align="left" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="550"> <tbody><tr style="background-color: rgb(236, 236, 236);" target="new" valign="top"> <td width="550"> STATISTICAL KEY: Pts: points scored; Pts: Points allowed; Avg.: Average; Diff.: Point differential; Rank Pts.: League ranking in points scored; Rank Yards: League ranking in yards gained; Rank Pts. All.: League ranking in points allowed; Rank Yds All.: League ranking in yards allowed; Opp. W-L: Combined winning percentage of opponents (includes games played against featured team); .500 +: Record against teams with record of .500 or better; Post. Score: Cumulative score in postseason games. Note: All statistics are regular season only. </td> </tr> </tbody></table> <!---------------------INLINE TABLE (END)-------------------->

Rankings by Kevin Jackson, Thomas Neumann and David Schoenfield. Capsules by Thomas Neumann and David Schoenfield. Statistical sources include "The ESPN Pro Football Encyclopedia," espn.com, pro-football-reference.com, databasefootball.com, superbowl.com, profootballhof.com and Eddie Epstein's "Dominance: The Best Seasons of Pro Football's Greatest Teams."
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dirty

EOG Master
#2
Re: ESPN Page 2's Super Bowl Team Rankings From #80-#1

<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"><tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"><td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]60.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1973 MINNESOTA VIKINGS 12-2 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>296</td> <td>21.1</td> <td>168</td> <td>12.0</td> <td>+128</td> <td>9 of 26</td> <td>7 of 26</td> <td>2 of 26</td> <td>12 of 26</td> <td>.472</td> <td>3-2</td> <td>61-54</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Miami 24-7 Coach: Bud Grant
Key players: QB Fran Tarkenton (2,113 yards, 15 TD), RB Chuck Foreman (801 yards), WR John Gilliam, OT Ron Yary, DT Alan Page, DE Carl Eller, LB Jeff Siemon, S Paul Krause </td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Minnesota's defense helped push the Vikings to their second NFC title, but it was ultimately punctured by the Miami running game in the Super Bowl. The Vikings allowed the second-fewest points in the NFL, but ranked toward the middle of the pack in yards allowed. Fran Tarkenton compiled the highest passer rating of his career (93.2), and rookie Chuck Foreman made an impact with 1,163 yards from scrimmage. The Vikings boasted seven Pro Bowl selections and five future Hall of Famers on their roster.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]59.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1972 WASHINGTON REDSKINS 11-3 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>336</td> <td>24.0</td> <td>218</td> <td>15.6</td> <td>+118</td> <td>7 of 26</td> <td>11 of 26</td> <td>3 of 26</td> <td>4 of 26</td> <td>.452</td> <td>6-1</td> <td>49-20</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Miami 14-7 Coach: George Allen
Key players: QB Billy Kilmer (1,648 yards, 19 TD), RB Larry Brown (1,216 yards), WR Charley Taylor, TE, Jerry Smith, C Len Hauss, LB Chris Hanburger, DB Pat Fischer</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
In his second season at the helm in Washington, George Allen coached the "Over the Hill Gang" to the NFC championship. The Redskins enjoyed solid performances from Billy Kilmer and Larry Brown, but their offense ranked just 11th in total yardage. After earning two playoff victories by a combined score of 42-6, Washington was actually a slight favorite over the undefeated Dolphins in Super Bowl VII. However, the Redskins were unable to dent Miami's "no-name defense" and were 2:07 from getting shut out until Mike Bass' fortuitous fumble recovery and touchdown return of Garo Yepremian's infamous flub.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]58.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1989 DENVER BRONCOS 11-5 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>362</td> <td>22.6</td> <td>226</td> <td>14.1</td> <td>+136</td> <td>9 of 28</td> <td>15 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>.518</td> <td>7-4</td> <td>61-99</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to San Francisco 55-10 Coach: Dan Reeves
Key players: QB John Elway (3,051 yards, 18 TD), RB Bobby Humphrey (1,151 yards), WR Vance Johnson (76 rec, 1,095 yards), DT Greg Kragen, LB Karl Mecklenburg, S Steve Atwater, S Dennis Smith</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Yes, this team was the victim of the largest blowout in Super Bowl history. Because of that drubbing, many fans forget that the Broncos allowed the fewest points in the league in '89 – safeties Steve Atwater and Dennis Smith were nasty. All five of Denver's regular-season losses were by seven points or fewer, and its only loss to a team with a losing record came after the Broncos had already clinched home-field advantage for the AFC playoffs. John Elway didn't have an exceptional season, but his scrambling ability made him much more valuable than the numbers might imply.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]57.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2002 OAKLAND RAIDERS 11-5 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>450</td> <td>28.1</td> <td>304</td> <td>19.0</td> <td>+146</td> <td>2 of 32</td> <td>1 of 32</td> <td>1 of 32</td> <td>11 of 32</td> <td>.529</td> <td>9-4</td> <td>92-82</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Tampa Bay 48-21 Coach: Bill Callahan
Key players: QB Rich Gannon (4,689 yards, 26 TD), RB Charlie Garner (1800 total yards), WR Jerry Rice, WR Tim Brown, OT Lincoln Kennedy, DT Rod Coleman, DT Sam Adams, S Rod Woodson </td> </tr> </tbody></table>
League MVP Rich Gannon played the best football of his career in leading the No. 2 offense in the league. Jerry Rice, Tim Brown, Charlie Garner and Jerry Porter combined for 315 receptions and 3,770 receiving yards. The Raiders faced a difficult schedule, going 9-4 against teams .500 or better. But they lost four straight at one point, and were woefully unprepared for Tampa Bay in the Super Bowl. The Raiders, 3?-point favorites in the big game, scored two offensive touchdowns – and allowed three defensive touchdowns.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]56.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1971 MIAMI DOLPHINS 10-3-1 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>315</td> <td>22.5</td> <td>174</td> <td>12.4</td> <td>+141</td> <td>4 of 26</td> <td>5 of 26</td> <td>3 of 26</td> <td>5 of 26</td> <td>.408</td> <td>2-1</td> <td>51-48</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Dallas 24-3 Coach: Don Shula
Key players: QB Bob Griese (2,089 yards, 19 TD), RB Larry Csonka (1,051 yards), WR Paul Warfield (11 TD), OG Larry Little, DE Bill Stanfill, LB Nick Buoniconti, S Jake Scott</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The first of three straight Super Bowl teams, the early '70s Dolphins had a simple strategy: run, run, run and then run some more … and then throw deep to Hall of Famer Paul Warfield. And then stop the other team. Offensively, Bob Griese compiled the highest passer rating of his career, and Larry Csonka had the first of three consecutive 1,000-yard rushing seasons. Miami survived the longest game in NFL history (82 minutes, 40 seconds) against the Chiefs in a divisional playoff, then shut out the Colts to win the AFC championship. However, it was a rough Super Bowl, as Miami's only points came on a field goal heading into halftime.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]55.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1967 OAKLAND RAIDERS 13-1 (1-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>468</td> <td>33.4</td> <td>233</td> <td>16.6</td> <td>+235</td> <td>1 of 9</td> <td>3 of 9</td> <td>2 of 9</td> <td>1 of 9</td> <td>n/a</td> <td>6-1</td> <td>54-40</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Green Bay 33-14 Coach: John Rauch
Key players: QB Daryle Lamonica (3,228 yards, 30 TD), RB Hewritt Dixon (559 yards, 59 rec), WR Fred Biletnikoff, TE Billy Cannon, C Jim Otto, DE Ben Davidson, CB Willie Brown</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Before John Madden came aboard, the Raiders were already an AFL powerhouse. This team ran (and threw) away from the rest of the AFL, finishing 3? games better than its closest pursuer and winning the league's title game by 33 points. Daryle Lamonica reached the 3,000-yard mark in passing yards for the first of three consecutive seasons, piloting a vertical game that saw Fred Biletnikoff emerge with his first of six Pro Bowl seasons. But the Raiders did nothing for the credibility of the upstart league by losing convincingly to a Packers team that was in decline and coming off the "Ice Bowl."
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]54.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1980 PHILADELPHIA EAGLES 12-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>384</td> <td>24.0</td> <td>222</td> <td>13.9</td> <td>+162</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>.449</td> <td>4-3</td> <td>61-50</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Oakland 27-10 Coach: Dick Vermeil
Key players: QB Ron Jaworski (3,529, 27 TD), RB Wilbert Montgomery (778 yards), WR Harold Carmichael, DT Charlie Johnson, LB Jerry Robinson, CB Herm Edwards</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Eagles were a team that thrived on defense, allowing the fewest points and second-fewest yards in the NFL. They also had solid offensive weapons in Ron Jaworski (top passer rating in the NFC in his best season), Wilbert Montgomery (1,185 yards from scrimmage, 50 receptions) and Harold Carmichael (nine touchdown catches). However, Philadelphia loses style points for dropping three of its last four regular-season games and for going just 4-3 against teams with a record of at least .500. The Eagles had just three Pro Bowlers that season and no players who ultimately reached the Hall of Fame.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]53.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1976 MINNESOTA VIKINGS 11-2-1 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>305</td> <td>21.8</td> <td>176</td> <td>12.6</td> <td>+129</td> <td>9 of 28</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>5 of 28</td> <td>.426</td> <td>2-2-1</td> <td>73-65</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Oakland 32-14 Coach: Bud Grant
Key players: QB Fran Tarkenton (2,961, 17 TD), RB Chuck Foreman (1,155 yards), WR Sammy White, WR Ahmad Rashad, OT Ron Yary, DT Alan Page, LB Matt Blair, CB Bobby Bryant</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
So we're back to Minnesota. It looked like this might be the team to break the Vikings' Super Bowl jinx. After all, they had one tie and two losses by one and four points. They had two new receivers in explosive rookie Sammy White and vet Ahmad Rashad. Chuck Foreman remained a passing/receiving threat at running back. This team boasted the last of the great Vikings defenses of the '70s, allowing the second-fewest points in the NFL. But there were clues the Super Bowl wouldn't turn out happily: The Vikings were just 2-2-1 against teams .500 or better in playing a weak schedule and the defense was 21st in average yards per rush. Sure enough, Oakland rushed for 266 yards in blowing out the Vikes in the big game.<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]52.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1991 BUFFALO BILLS 13-3 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>458</td> <td>28.6</td> <td>318</td> <td>19.9</td> <td>+140</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>19 of 28</td> <td>27 of 28</td> <td>.410</td> <td>6-2</td> <td>71-58</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Washington 37-24 Coach: Marv Levy
Key players: QB Jim Kelly (3,844 yards, 33 TD), RB Thurman Thomas (over 2,000 total yards), WR Andre Reed, WR James Lofton, LB Cornelius Bennett, LB Darryl Talley, LB Shane Conlan</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
We have the '90 Bills rated higher thanks to a much better defense, but this team was the apex of the no-huddle offensive powerhouse that finished third or higher in points four straight seasons ('89 through '92). This team had over 6,500 total yards (more than a thousand more than the '90 Bills). Amazingly, this Bills defense allowed the second-most yardage in the league. Jim Kelly and Frank Reich combined for 39 TD passes. Andre Reed and James Lofton both went over 1,000 yards receiving. Thurman Thomas was the NFL MVP – alas, he was stopped cold in the Super Bowl, rushing for just 13 yards on 10 carries.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]51.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1970 BALTIMORE COLTS 11-2-1 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>321</td> <td>22.9</td> <td>234</td> <td>16.7</td> <td>+87</td> <td>6 of 26</td> <td>8 of 26</td> <td>7 of 26</td> <td>9 of 26</td> <td>.370</td> <td>1-2</td> <td>60-30</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Dallas 16-13 Coach: Don McCafferty
Key players: QB Johnny Unitas (2,213 yards, 14 TD), QB Earl Morrall, WR Roy Jefferson, TE John Mackey, C Bill Curry, DE Bubba Smith, LB Mike Curtis, LB Ted Hendricks</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The least memorable Super Bowl champ of all time, the Colts earned that distinction: They lost four fumbles and threw three interceptions and still won the game. Of course, the Cowboys tossed three picks of their own and committed 10 penalties (seriously, these Super Bowls from the early '70s are unwatchable when you see them pop up on TV). Baltimore's leading rusher gained just 426 yards. Johnny Unitas, the primary quarterback, threw 18 interceptions against 14 touchdowns and completed just 51.7 percent of his passes. Also, the Colts had the second-easiest strength of schedule among postmerger Super Bowl teams, losing two of their three games against .500-plus teams -- by 20 and 17 points. Wait, is it too late to adjust our rankings?
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]50.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2005 SEATTLE SEAHAWKS 13-3 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>452</td> <td>28.3</td> <td>271</td> <td>16.9</td> <td>+181</td> <td>1 of 32</td> <td>2 of 32</td> <td>7 of 32</td> <td>16 of 32</td> <td>.430</td> <td>4-2</td> <td>64-45</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Pittsburgh 21-10 Coach: Mike Holmgren
Key players: QB Matt Hasselbeck (3,455 yards, 24 TD), RB Shaun Alexander (1,880 yards, 28 TD), WR Darrell Jackson, OT Walter Jones, OG Steve Hutchinson, DT Bryce Fisher, LB Lofa Tatupu</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
What does it say about Seattle that it became the only team to outgain and commit fewer turnovers than its Super Bowl opponent and still lose? It means the Seahawks either (A) got screwed, or (B) easily could be ranked ahead of the Steelers. Alas, we stick them here, because (A) they did lose just three games, including one in OT and the season finale in which Shaun Alexander and Matt Hasselback sat the second half, but (B) benefited from a very easy schedule, and (C) featured the NFL MVP in Alexander, but (D) still managed to mess up the Super Bowl by dropping several passes and allowing two big plays to Pittsburgh.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]49.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1968 NEW YORK JETS 11-3 (2-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>419</td> <td>29.9</td> <td>280</td> <td>20.0</td> <td>+139</td> <td>2 of 10</td> <td>3 of 10</td> <td>4 of 10</td> <td>1 of 10</td> <td>n/a</td> <td>5-1</td> <td>43-30</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Baltimore 16-7 Coach: Weeb Ewbank
Key players: QB Joe Namath (3,147 yards, 15 TD), RB Matt Snell (747 yards), WR Don Maynard (1,297 yards), WR George Sauer (1,141 yards), OT Winston Hill, DE Verlon Briggs, DE Gerry Philbin</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Jets are undeniably the biggest surprise in Super Bowl history, but they are also one of the least impressive champions. Sure, there's the glitz of Joe Namath and his guarantee of victory over an 18-point favorite. New York also boasted a future Hall of Fame wide receiver in Don Maynard and a solid ground game with Matt Snell and Emerson Boozer. However, the Jets had just the third-best record in the AFL that season. Namath completed fewer than 50 percent of his passes, throwing more interceptions than touchdowns. Coincidentally, Weeb Ewbank coached New York to victory in the Super Bowl over his former team, the Colts. Oh yeah … and the Jets lost the "Heidi" game that season.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]48.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1967 GREEN BAY PACKERS 9-4-1 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>332</td> <td>23.7</td> <td>209</td> <td>14.9</td> <td>+123</td> <td>9 of 16</td> <td>9 of 16</td> <td>3 of 16</td> <td>1 of 16</td> <td>n/a</td> <td>5-2</td> <td>82-38</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Oakland 33-14 Coach: Bud Vince Lombardi
Key players: QB Bart Starr (1,823 yards, 9 TD), RB Donny Anderson, WR Boyd Dowler, OT Forrest Gregg, OG Jerry Kramer, DE Willie Davis, CB Herb Adderly, S Willie Wood</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Bring on the hate, old-school Packers fans, but the team that marked the end of the 1960s Packers dynasty also winds up near the bottom of the Super Bowl winners. This team gets docked for ranking just ninth out of 16 NFL teams in points and yards gained. Bart Starr would become Super Bowl MVP but he threw almost twice as many interceptions (17) as touchdowns (9). Further, its leading rusher, Jim Grabowski, averaged just 3.9 yards per carry. That said, the Packers flipped the switch in Vince Lombardi's final postseason, routing the top-seeded Rams, sneaking past Dallas in the Ice Bowl and ultimately toppling the Raiders for the world championship.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]47.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2001 NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS 11-5 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>371</td> <td>23.2</td> <td>272</td> <td>17.0</td> <td>+99</td> <td>6 of 31</td> <td>19 of 31</td> <td>6 of 31</td> <td>24 of 31</td> <td>.449</td> <td>2-4</td> <td>60-47</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat St. Louis 20-17 Coach: Bill Belichick
Key players: QB Tom Brady (2,843 yards, 18 TD), RB Antowain Smith (1,157 yards, 13 TD), WR Troy Brown (101 rec), DE Willie McGinest, CB Ty Law, S Lawyer Milloy, K Adam Vinatieri</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Patriots grabbed opportunity by the throat and didn't let go until pundits had crowned them as a dynasty. New England took advantage of Adam Vinatieri's clutch field goals, the tuck rule and postseason touchdowns by its special teams and defense en route to its first Super Bowl victory. But the Patriots had poor rankings in offensive and defensive yardage (outgained overall). Credit Tom Brady and Troy Brown for having terrific seasons, but a legitimate argument can be made that the Patriots were inferior to all three of their postseason opponents. That's why New England was a 14-point underdog to the Rams.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]46.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2004 PHILADELPHIA EAGLES 13-3 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>386</td> <td>24.1</td> <td>260</td> <td>16.3</td> <td>+126</td> <td>8 of 32</td> <td>9 of 32</td> <td>3 of 32</td> <td>10 of 32</td> <td>.453</td> <td>3-2</td> <td>75-48</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to New England 24-21 Coach: Andy Reid
Key players: QB Donovan McNabb (3,875 yards, 31 TD), RB Brian Westbrook, WR Terrell Owens (1,200 yards, 14 TD), OT Tra Thomas, LB, Jeremiah Trotter, CB Lito Sheppard, S Brian Dawkins</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Donovan McNabb had his best season by far (104.7 QB rating) and Brian Westbrook and Terrell Owens, two of 10 Eagles named to the Pro Bowl roster, also had tremendous seasons. Two of the Eagles' losses came while resting their starters after a 13-1 start clinched home-field advantage for the playoffs. Their only other defeat came against the 15-1 Steelers. Their two playoff victories were by 13 and 17 points. However, this team was near the top of the league in just one major statistical category, fewest points allowed, and it played just two teams in the regular season with records above .500.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]45.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1969 MINNESOTA VIKINGS 12-2 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>379</td> <td>27.1</td> <td>133</td> <td>9.5</td> <td>+246</td> <td>1 of 16</td> <td>10 of 16</td> <td>1 of 16</td> <td>1 of 16</td> <td>n/a</td> <td>7-0</td> <td>57-50</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Kansas City 23-7 Coach: Bud Grant
Key players: QB Joe Kapp (1,726 yards, 19 TD), RB Dave Osborn, WR Gene Washington, C Mick Tingelhoff, OT Ron Yary, DE Carl Eller, DE Jim Marshall, DT Alan Page, DT Gary Larsen</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
OK, Vikings fans, one last bit of tortured memory for you. This team was powered by a stingy Purple People Eater defense that ranked No. 1 in the NFL in points and yards allowed (all four members of the D-line made the Pro Bowl). It also went 7-0 against opponents with a record of .500 or better. How good was the D? Minnesota was just 10th out of 16 teams in yards but still led the NFL in scoring (yeah, those league-leading 30 interceptions helped). All pretty stats. But then came Super Bowl IV – five turnovers doomed Minnesota, a 13-point favorite over Kansas City.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]44.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1998 ATLANTA FALCONS 14-2 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>442</td> <td>27.6</td> <td>289</td> <td>18.1</td> <td>+153</td> <td>4 of 30</td> <td>7 of 30</td> <td>4 of 30</td> <td>8 of 30</td> <td>.492</td> <td>4-2</td> <td>69-79</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Denver 34-19 Coach: Dan Reeves
Key players: QB Chris Chandler (3,154 yards, 25 TD), RB Jamal Anderson (1,846 yards, 16 TD), WR Terance Mathis, WR Tony Martin, LB Jessie Tuggle, CB Ray Buchanan, S Eugene Robinson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Falcons rumbled through the NFC West behind workhorse Jamal Anderson's 410 carries, an NFL record until 2006. Chris Chandler posted a career-best passer rating, and Tony Martin and Terance Mathis each topped 60 receptions and 1,100 yards. Atlanta knocked out the highest-scoring team in NFL history in the NFC Championship Game. Its only two losses came against 12-4 teams. Of course, if Minnesota's Gary Anderson hadn't missed a field-goal attempt for the first time that season, it would've been the Vikings in the Super Bowl instead of the Falcons.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]43.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1990 BUFFALO BILLS 13-3 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>428</td> <td>26.8</td> <td>263</td> <td>16.4</td> <td>+165</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>.477</td> <td>4-3</td> <td>115-57</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to New York Giants 20-19 Coach: Marv Levy
Key players: QB Jim Kelly (2,829, 23 TD), RB Thurman Thomas (1,297 yards), WR Andre Reed, WR James Lofton, C Kent Hull, DE Bruce Smith, LB Cornelius Bennett, LB Shane Conlan, LB Darryl Talley</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This was probably the best team in Bills history -- certainly its best combo of offense and defense. After leading the league in points scored, Buffalo scored 95 points in its first two playoff games, including a 48-point victory over the Raiders in the AFC Championship Game. Jim Kelly posted an NFL- and career-best passer rating, and Thurman Thomas had 1,829 yards from scrimmage and 13 touchdowns. Based on that offensive firepower, Buffalo entered the Super Bowl as a touchdown favorite over the Giants. Despite possessing the ball for less than 20 minutes, the Bills narrowly lost as Scott Norwood's 47-yard field-goal attempt sailed wide right.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]42.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1988 SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS 10-6 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>369</td> <td>23.1</td> <td>294</td> <td>18.4</td> <td>+75</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>.512</td> <td>6-3</td> <td>82-28</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Cincinnati 20-16 Coach: Bill Walsh
Key players: QB Joe Montana (2,981 yards, 18 TD), RB Roger Craig (2,036 total yards), RB Tom Rathman, WR Jerry Rice (1,304 yards), OG Guy McIntyre, LB Charles Haley, S Ronnie Lott</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The least impressive of the 49ers' championship teams, it had the most losses of any Super Bowl champion, but it proved it belonged with a memorable touchdown drive in the final minutes. Although the Niners lost six games in Bill Walsh's final season, they went 6-3 against .500 or better teams and easily won their first two postseason games (34-9 and 28-3). Joe Montana had an average season by his standards, but San Francisco enjoyed fine seasons by Roger Craig and Jerry Rice, each of whom scored 10 touchdowns. This team proved that even a mediocre season during the 49ers dynasty was pretty darn good.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]41.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2005 PITTSBURGH STEELERS 11-5 (4-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>389</td> <td>24.3</td> <td>258</td> <td>16.1</td> <td>+131</td> <td>9 of 32</td> <td>15 of 32</td> <td>3 of 32</td> <td>3 of 32</td> <td>.492</td> <td>4-4</td> <td>107-62</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Seattle 21-10 Coach: Bill Cowher
Key players: QB Ben Roethlisberger (2,385, 17 TD), RB Willie Parker (1,202 yards), WR Hines Ward (11 TD), OG Alan Faneca, DT Casey Hampton, LB Joey Porter, LB James Farrior, S Troy Polamalu</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Steelers hit their stride at the right time and won the Super Bowl as a wild card after winning their final four regular-season games to qualify for the playoffs. They also vanquished the seemingly invincible Colts in the divisional round by avenging a regular-season drubbing and edged the NFL's top-scoring team in the Super Bowl. Despite a powerful running game, Pittsburgh was 7-5 through 12 games (although two of those defeats came in OT with Ben Roethlisberger injured). It had just one player, Hines Ward, with more than 35 receptions, and zero skill-position players selected to the Pro Bowl. <!---------------------INLINE TABLE (BEGIN)--------------------> <table id="inlinetable" target="new" align="left" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="550"> <tbody><tr style="background-color: rgb(236, 236, 236);" target="new" valign="top"> <td width="550"> STATISTICAL KEY: Pts: points scored; Pts: Points allowed; Avg.: Average; Diff.: Point differential; Rank Pts.: League ranking in points scored; Rank Yards: League ranking in yards gained; Rank Pts. All.: League ranking in points allowed; Rank Yds All.: League ranking in yards allowed; Opp. W-L: Combined winning percentage of opponents (includes games played against featured team); .500 +: Record against teams with record of .500 or better; Post. Score: Cumulative score in postseason games. Note: All statistics are regular season only. </td> </tr> </tbody></table> <!---------------------INLINE TABLE (END)-------------------->
 

dirty

EOG Master
#3
Re: ESPN Page 2's Super Bowl Team Rankings From #80-#1

<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"><tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"><td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]40.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1980 OAKLAND RAIDERS 11-5 (4-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>364</td> <td>22.8</td> <td>306</td> <td>19.1</td> <td>+58</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>16 of 28</td> <td>10 of 28</td> <td>11 of 28</td> <td>.508</td> <td>6-5</td> <td>102-56</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Philadelphia 27-10 Coach: Tom Flores
Key players: QB Jim Plunkett (2,299 yards, 18 TD), RB Mark van Eeghen (838 yards), RB Kenny King, WR Cliff Branch, OT Art Shell, LB Ted Hendricks, LB Rod Martin, CB Lester Hayes</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Not the greatest team of all time, but certainly the team you'd like to have a few adult beverages with. Or purchase stickum from. Infamous for tearing up New Orleans with its partying leading up to the Super Bowl, this team also provided one of the unheralded great Super Bowl moments: commissioner Pete Rozelle handing the Lombardi Trophy to Al Davis (who was involved in a lawsuit against the NFL at the time). Ordinary statistically (they relied on a league-leading 35 interceptions, including 13 by Lester Hayes), the Raiders ramped things up in the postseason. They romped against Houston's No. 2 scoring defense, won road games against the Browns and Air Coryell Chargers (both division champions) and convincingly beat a favored Eagles team in the Super Bowl.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]39.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1982 WASHINGTON REDSKINS 8-1 (4-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>190</td> <td>21.1</td> <td>128</td> <td>14.2</td> <td>+62</td> <td>12 of 28</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>.481</td> <td>3-1</td> <td>110-48</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Miami 27-17 Coach: Joe Gibbs
Key players: QB Joe Theismann (91.3 QB rating), RB John Riggins, WR Art Monk, WR Charlie Brown, OG Russ Grimm, OT Joe Jacoby, DE Dexter Manley, DT Dave Butz, K Mark Moseley</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
How bizarre was the 1982 strike-shortened season? Kicker Mark Moseley was named NFL MVP. That is not a misprint (he was 20-of-21 on field goals but, oddly, just 16-of-19 on extra points). A year after beginning his head coaching career 0-5, Joe Gibbs piloted the Redskins to their first Super Bowl victory. Despite allowing the fewest points in the NFL during a nine-game, strike-shortened regular season, Washington was a three-point underdog in the Super Bowl. Behind The Hogs, John Riggins rumbled for a then-Super Bowl record 166 rushing yards, becoming the first NFL player to rush for 100 or more yards in four consecutive postseason games.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]38.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1969 KANSAS CITY CHIEFS 11-3 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>359</td> <td>25.6</td> <td>177</td> <td>12.6</td> <td>+182</td> <td>2 of 10</td> <td>3 of 10</td> <td>1 of 10</td> <td>1 of 10</td> <td>n/a</td> <td>4-2</td> <td>53-20</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Minnesota 23-7 Coach: Hank Stram
Key players: QB Len Dawson (1,323 yards, 9 TD), RB Mike Garrett, WR Otis Taylor, OG Ed Budde, DT Buck Buchanan, DT Curley Culp, LB Willie Lanier, LB Bobby Bell, K Jan Stenerud</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
We give this team credit for boasting five future Hall of Famers and convincingly beating a Vikings squad that ranked No. 1 in the NFL in points scored and fewest points allowed. Kansas City's only Super Bowl victory evened the series between the AFL and NFL at 2-2 in the final premerger clash. But there are negatives. The Chiefs didn't even win their division, getting swept by the Raiders and losing to the second-year Bengals. Their primary quarterback, Len Dawson, threw 13 interceptions and just nine touchdowns.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]37.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1997 GREEN BAY PACKERS 13-3 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>422</td> <td>26.4</td> <td>282</td> <td>17.6</td> <td>+140</td> <td>2 of 30</td> <td>4 of 30</td> <td>5 of 30</td> <td>7 of 30</td> <td>.521</td> <td>7-1</td> <td>68-48</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Denver 31-24 Coach: Mike Holmgren
Key players: QB Brett Favre (3,867 yards, 35 TD), RB Dorsey Levens (1,435 yards), WR Antonio Freeman, WR Robert Brooks, TE Mark Chmura, DE Reggie White, S Leroy Butler, S Eugene Robinson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Coming off a Super Bowl title and a dominant regular season, the Packers were perceived to still be the class of the NFL. They were No. 2 in points scored and entered the Super Bowl as an 11?-point favorite. Brett Favre won his third MVP award and the supporting cast on offense was even better statistically than in '96. The '97 Pack got 1,805 yards from scrimmage and 12 touchdowns from Dorsey Levens and more than 1,000 receiving yards from both Antonio Freeman and Robert Brooks. The Packers went 7-1 against teams with a record of .500 or better. But the Pack had one weakness: stopping the run. Terrell Davis rushed for 157 yards and three TDs and Denver had the upset.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]36.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1968 BALTIMORE COLTS 13-1 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>402</td> <td>28.7</td> <td>144</td> <td>10.3</td> <td>+258</td> <td>2 of 16</td> <td>4 of 16</td> <td>1 of 16</td> <td>2 of 16</td> <td>n/a</td> <td>7-1</td> <td>67-30</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to New York Jets 16-7 Coach: Don Shula
Key players: QB Earl Morrall (2,909 yards, 26 TD), QB Johnny Unitas, RB Tom Matte, WR Jimmy Orr, TE John Mackey, OT Bob Vogel, DE Bubba Smith, DT Fred Miller, LB Mike Curtis</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
There were many reasons this team was the second-biggest favorite in Super Bowl history. It allowed the fewest points in the NFL and ranked No. 2 in points scored. Its only loss came against Cleveland, a division champion. Baltimore's Bubba Smith-led defense held opponents to 10 or fewer points 10 times in 14 regular-season games, including three shutouts. The Colts are one of six Super Bowl participants – and the only loser – to score twice as many points as their opponents in the regular season and the postseason. This was a great team and we're ranking the Colts ahead of the team that beat them in Super Bowl III.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]35.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2002 TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS 12-4 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>346</td> <td>21.6</td> <td>196</td> <td>12.3</td> <td>+150</td> <td>18 of 32</td> <td>23 of 32</td> <td>1 of 32</td> <td>1 of 32</td> <td>.482</td> <td>4-4</td> <td>106-37</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Oakland 48-21 Coach: Jon Gruden
Key players: QB Brad Johnson (3,049 yards, 22 TD), RB Mike Alstott, WR Keyshawn Johnson (1,088 yards), DT Warren Sapp, DE Simeon Rice, LB Derrick Brooks, CB Ronde Barber, S John Lynch</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Defense, defense, defense. Tampa Bay's offensive rankings were even worse than those of the 2000 Ravens. But the Bucs' defense was tops in the league in points, yardage and intimidation (this team actually allowed fewer points than the famed '85 Bears). It scored three touchdowns in the Super Bowl – one more than Oakland's offense. OK, so the running game was minimal (Michael Pittman, anyone?), but underrated quarterback Brad Johnson was No. 3 in the NFL in passer rating, with 22 touchdowns and just six interceptions, and Keyshawn Johnson topped 1,000 receiving yards for the fourth time.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]34.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1984 MIAMI DOLPHINS 14-2 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>513</td> <td>32.1</td> <td>298</td> <td>18.6</td> <td>+215</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>19 of 28</td> <td>.428</td> <td>6-1</td> <td>92-76</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to San Francisco 38-16 Coach: Don Shula
Key players: QB Dan Marino (5,084 yards, 48 TD), RB Tony Nathan, RB Woody Bennett, WR Mark Clayton (18 TD), WR Mark Duper, C Dwight Stephenson, DT Bob Baumhower</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
No old-school coach adapted to the new NFL better than Don Shula. He abandoned his love of the ground game after drafting Dan Marino, and the second-year pro enjoyed an incredible statistical season, compiling the eighth-highest passer rating in NFL history. Marino's 48 touchdowns were a league record until 2004, and his 5,084 yards remain the record. Wide receivers Mark Clayton and Mark Duper each topped 70 receptions and 1,300 yards as the Dolphins scored more touchdowns than any team in NFL history (70). Miami's bend-but-don't break defense – ranked seventh in points, but 19th in yardage – was ultimately exposed by the explosive 49ers in the Super Bowl.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]33.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1990 NEW YORK GIANTS 13-3 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>335</td> <td>20.9</td> <td>211</td> <td>13.2</td> <td>+124</td> <td>15 of 28</td> <td>16 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>.508</td> <td>4-3</td> <td>66-35</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Buffalo 20-19 Coach: Bill Parcells
Key players: QB Phil Simms (2,284 yards, 15 TD), QB Jeff Hostetler (614 yards, 3 TD), RB Ottis Anderson, TE Mark Bavaro, C Bart Oates, DT Erik Howard, LB Lawrence Taylor, LB Pepper Johnson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
We can already hear the uproar from Gotham over this one. Yes, we're ranking a 13-3 Bill Parcells-coached team that beat a strong Bills squad in the Super Bowl this low. But there's no way around the facts. This team finished in the bottom half of the NFL in points scored and won the NFC Championship Game and Super Bowl by a combined three points. Its leading rusher, Ottis Anderson, didn't approach the 1,000-yard mark, and none of its wide receivers caught 30 passes. It started a relatively green Jeff Hostetler as its postseason quarterback and ultimately relied on the errant foot of Scott Norwood to secure its championship. How did the Giants win? They didn't make mistakes, committing just 14 turnovers -- the fewest since the NFL went to a 16-game schedule in 1978.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]32.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2003 NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS 14-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>348</td> <td>21.8</td> <td>238</td> <td>14.9</td> <td>+110</td> <td>12 of 32</td> <td>17 of 32</td> <td>1 of 32</td> <td>7 of 32</td> <td>.484</td> <td>7-0</td> <td>73-57</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Carolina 32-29 Coach: Bill Belichick
Key players: QB Tom Brady (3,620 yards, 23 TD), RB Kevin Faulk, WR Deion Branch (803 yards), DE Richard Seymour, LB Willie McGinest, LB Tedy Bruschi, LB Mike Vrabel, CB Ty Law, S Rodney Harrison</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
How did this team go 14-2? Bill Belichick didn't even have his magic hoodie yet. Despite outgaining its opponents by just 339 yards and outscoring them by just 110 points, the Pats lost only twice. New England's stout defense made up for a pedestrian offense, as the Patriots allowed the fewest points in the league for the only time in franchise history. After a shaky 2-2 start, the Pats reeled off 12 consecutive victories to close the regular season. They had an efficient march through the playoffs (17-14 over Tennessee, 24-14 over Indianapolis as Ty Law picked off Peyton Manning three times in snowy conditions), but faced a weak Super Bowl foe in the Panthers.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]31.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1974 PITTSBURGH STEELERS 10-3-1 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>305</td> <td>21.8</td> <td>189</td> <td>13.5</td> <td>+116</td> <td>6 of 26</td> <td>8 of 26</td> <td>2 of 26</td> <td>1 of 26</td> <td>.431</td> <td>3-3-1</td> <td>72-33</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Minnesota 16-6 Coach: Chuck Noll
Key players: QB Terry Bradshaw (785 yards, 7 TD), QB Joe Gilliam (1,274 yards), RB Franco Harris (1,006 yards), DT Joe Greene, DE L.C. Greenwood, LB Jack Ham, LB Andy Russell, CB Mel Blount</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This season was a turning point in the history of the Steelers franchise. First, Pittsburgh selected Lynn Swann, Jack Lambert, John Stallworth and Mike Webster – all future Hall of Famers – in the draft. Then it witnessed the coronation of the Steel Curtain as the team captured its first championship in 42 NFL seasons. Pittsburgh made up for its lack of a strong passing attack by pounding the ball effectively on the ground. The team's top receiver, Frank Lewis, had just 30 receptions, but Franco Harris and company were second in the league in rushing yardage.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]30.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1987 WASHINGTON REDSKINS 11-4 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>379</td> <td>25.3</td> <td>285</td> <td>19.0</td> <td>+94</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>18 of 28</td> <td>.427</td> <td>1-1</td> <td>80-37</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Denver 42-10 Coach: Joe Gibbs
Key players: QB Doug Williams (1,156 yards, 11 TD), QB Jay Schroeder (1,878, 12 TD), RB George Rogers, WR Gary Clark (1,066 yards), OT Joe Jacoby, DE Charles Mann, CB Darrell Green</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
As Super Bowl XXII kicked off, it was difficult to know what to expect from the Redskins, who were three-point underdogs to Denver. Washington entered the playoffs with a quarterback controversy and a defense ranked 18th in yards allowed. It had just the third-best record in the NFC, even with a soft schedule and a 3-0 mark in games involving replacement players. As it turned out, unheralded Timmy Smith ran for a Super Bowl-record 204 yards, and Doug Williams and Ricky Sanders burned the Broncos' secondary in an easy victory.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]29.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2000 BALTIMORE RAVENS 12-4 (4-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>333</td> <td>20.8</td> <td>165</td> <td>10.3</td> <td>+168</td> <td>14 of 31</td> <td>16 of 31</td> <td>1 of 31</td> <td>2 of 31</td> <td>.426</td> <td>3-4</td> <td>95-23</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat New York Giants 34-7 Coach: Brian Billick
Key players: QB Trent Dilfer (1,502 yards, 15 TD), RB Jamal Lewis (1,364 yards), TE Shannon Sharpe, OT Jonathan Ogden, DT Sam Adams, LB Ray Lewis, CB Chris McAlister, S Rod Woodson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
We struggled where to rank this team more than any other. Statistically, this was the best defense in NFL history (the Ravens allowed 33 fewer points than the '85 Bears). Led by Super Bowl MVP Ray Lewis, it allowed just 10.3 points per game and 2.69 yards per rushing attempt. Including the postseason, the Ravens held their opponents to 10 or fewer points 15 times, including four shutouts. Baltimore allowed a mere 5.8 points per game in four postseason contests. If not for a kickoff returned for a touchdown, the Ravens would have recorded the only shutout in Super Bowl history. Alas, defense is only half the game. Baltimore's offense, which went five consecutive games without a touchdown at one point and saw Tony Banks benched for Trent Dilfer, relied heavily on rookie running back Jamal Lewis (backup Priest Holmes wasn't too shabby, either). Also, note that the Ravens played a soft schedule and didn't even win their division (Tennessee went 13-3).
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]28.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1983 WASHINGTON REDSKINS 14-2 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>541</td> <td>33.8</td> <td>332</td> <td>20.8</td> <td>+109</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>11 of 28</td> <td>12 of 28</td> <td>.484</td> <td>7-2</td> <td>84-66</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Los Angeles Raiders 38-9 Coach: Joe Gibbs
Key players: QB Joe Theismann (3,714 yards, 29 TD), RB John Riggins (1,347 yards, 24 TD), RB Joe Washington, WR Charlie Brown (1,225 yards), WR Art Monk, OT Joe Jacoby, DT Dave Butz</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Redskins seemed to be on the verge of a dynasty. Coming off a victory in Super Bowl XVII, Washington boasted the second-highest point total in NFL history at 541. Both of its losses were by a single point. The weapons were plentiful: Joe Thiesmann (career highs in passing yards, touchdowns and passer rating), John Riggins (career highs in rushing yards and touchdowns), Joe Washington (1,226 yards from scrimmage) and Charlie Brown. Something often overlooked regarding this team is its ordinary defense, which ranked 11th in points allowed and 12th in yards allowed and featured just one Pro Bowler (Dave Butz). Some of the yards did result from opponents trying to play catch-up (the Redskins were last in passing yards allowed, but first in interceptions).
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]27.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1983 LOS ANGELES RAIDERS 12-4 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>442</td> <td>27.6</td> <td>338</td> <td>21.1</td> <td>+104</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>13 of 28</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>.496</td> <td>5-4</td> <td>106-33</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Washington 38-9 Coach: Tom Flores
Key players: QB Jim Plunkett (2,935 yards, 20 TD), RB Marcus Allen (1,014 yards), TE Todd Christensen (1,247 yards, 12 TD), DE Howie Long, LB Matt Millen, CB Lester Hayes, S Vann McElroy</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Raiders brought Los Angeles its only Super Bowl title as it avenged a regular-season defeat at Washington by shutting down the high-powered Redskins. The impressive Super Bowl win helps vault this team to No. 27 despite some shaky times during the regular season (the Raiders allowed more than 30 points five times). Los Angeles won all three of its postseason games by more than two touchdowns (although the Raiders were helped when 9-7 Seattle upset 12-4 Miami in the divisional round). Second-year pro Marcus Allen had an excellent season, with 1,604 yards from scrimmage, 11 touchdowns and 68 receptions. Todd Christensen led the league with 92 receptions, an NFL record at the time for a tight end.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]26.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1995 DALLAS COWBOYS 12-4 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>435</td> <td>27.2</td> <td>291</td> <td>18.2</td> <td>+144</td> <td>3 of 30</td> <td>5 of 30</td> <td>3 of 30</td> <td>7 of 30</td> <td>.484</td> <td>8-2</td> <td>95-55</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Pittsburgh 27-17 Coach: Barry Switzer
Key players: QB Troy Aikman (3,304 yards, 16 TD), RB Emmitt Smith (1,773 yards, 25 TD), WR Michael Irvin (1,603 yards), OT Larry Allen, OT Erik Williams, LB Charles Haley, CB Deion Sanders</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
We thought about ranking the Cowboys higher and then remembered Barry Switzer was the coach. And that they lost twice to a 6-10 Redskins team. Still, it seemed this team could turn it up whenever it needed to -- and won its third Super Bowl in four years with a team that ranked third in the NFL in both points scored and fewest points allowed. Emmitt Smith enjoyed his finest season with career highs in rushing yards, touchdowns and receptions. This team equaled the 8-2 mark against teams .500 or better of the '93 Cowboys and had 10 players named to the Pro Bowl. After ousting the emerging Packers in the NFC Championship Game, Dallas captured the franchise's fifth championship thanks in large part to Larry Brown's two Super Bowl interceptions.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]25.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1981 SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS 13-3 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>357</td> <td>22.3</td> <td>250</td> <td>15.6</td> <td>+107</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>13 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>.418</td> <td>6-1</td> <td>92-72</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Cincinnati 26-21 Coach: Bill Walsh
Key players: QB Joe Montana (3,565 yards, 19 TD), WR Dwight Clark (1,105 yards), WR Freddie Solomon, OG Randy Cross, DE Fred Dean, LB Jack Reynolds, CB Ronnie Lott, S Dwight Hicks</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
San Francisco's dynasty was born in its final two games of this season: the NFC Championship Game victory capped by "The Catch" and the Super Bowl XVI victory in Pontiac, Mich. Despite the reputation of the 49ers' passing attack, with Joe Montana, Dwight Clark and Freddie Solomon, the team's defense was actually more impressive, ranking No. 2 in the NFL in points and yards allowed – the big reason for the team's rise from 6-10 in 1980 was the addition of rookie defensive backs Ronnie Lott, Eric Wright and Carlton Williamson, all Super Bowl starters. The rushing attack was substandard, however, averaging a lowly 3.47 yards per attempt. The 49ers went 6-1 against teams with a .500 record or better, but enjoyed a soft schedule overall.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]24.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1977 DALLAS COWBOYS 12-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>345</td> <td>28.8</td> <td>212</td> <td>15.1</td> <td>+133</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>.485</td> <td>5-2</td> <td>87-23</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Denver 27-10 Coach: Tom Landry
Key players: QB Roger Staubach (2,620 yards, 18 TD), RB Tony Dorsett (1,007 yards), WR Drew Pearson, DT Randy White, DE Harvey Martin, DE Too Tall Jones, S Cliff Harris, S Charlie Waters</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Ironically, we ranked the '78 edition of the Cowboys higher, even though this team won the Super Bowl. By adding rookie Tony Dorsett to an offensive mix that included Roger Staubach in his prime, Dallas reached its fourth Super Bowl and won the big game for the second time. The Cowboys' average margin of victory was 21.8 points in the postseason. It won its first eight games of the season and its last four. Dallas' defense wasn't as stout as it would be the following year, as it ranked eighth in points allowed, five spots lower than in '78.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]23.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2001 ST. LOUIS RAMS 14-2 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>503</td> <td>31.4</td> <td>273</td> <td>17.1</td> <td>+230</td> <td>1 of 31</td> <td>1 of 31</td> <td>7 of 31</td> <td>3 of 31</td> <td>.473</td> <td>6-1</td> <td>91-61</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to New England 20-17 Coach: Mike Martz
Key players: QB Kurt Warner (4,830 yards, 36 TD), RB Marshall Faulk (1,382 yards, 21 TD), WR Torry Holt, WR Isaac Bruce, OT Orlando Pace, DE Leonard Little, CB Aeneas Williams</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Wait … here are the 2001 Rams, this far ahead of the team that beat them in the Super Bowl? Exactly. We're saying the Rams were better – by a wide margin – but were surprised by an opportunistic (code name for "lucky") New England squad. St. Louis ranked No. 1 in the NFL in points scored (despite committing the most turnovers in the league) and offensive yardage and third in the league in yards allowed – 21 spots ahead of the Pats. More evidence? The Rams outgained their opponents by an astonishing 2,219 yards while New England was outgained overall. Marshall Faulk topped 2,000 yards from scrimmage, and Kurt Warner passed for the second-most yards in NFL history. The Rams' losses were by just seven and three points. Blame Mike Martz for the Super Bowl loss. Or Lady Luck.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]22.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1966 GREEN BAY PACKERS 12-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>335</td> <td>23.9</td> <td>163</td> <td>11.6</td> <td>+172</td> <td>4 of 15</td> <td>7 of 15</td> <td>1 of 15</td> <td>3 of 15</td> <td>n/a</td> <td>6-1</td> <td>69-37</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Kansas City 35-10 Coach: Vince Lombardi
Key players: QB Bart Starr (2,257 yards, 14 TD), RB Jim Taylor, RB Elijah Pitts, WR Carroll Dale, OT Forrest Gregg, DE Willie Davis, DT Henry Jordan, LB Ray Nitschke, CB Herb Adderly, S Willie Wood</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This might be considered a low ranking for the first Super Bowl champion, a team that routed its AFL challenger. But we're grading teams here, not dynasties, and we believe that the '62 Packers were the best of the bunch offered by Vince Lombardi. The '66 team was pretty mediocre on offense, ranking in the middle of the NFL pack in yards gained, and its leading rusher, Jim Taylor, averaged just 3.5 yards per carry. Nevertheless, this team suffered its two losses by a combined four points, and regular-season MVP Bart Starr enjoyed his finest season with a 105.0 passer rating. This team had nine future Hall of Famers on its roster.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]21.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1973 MIAMI DOLPHINS 12-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>343</td> <td>24.5</td> <td>150</td> <td>10.7</td> <td>+193</td> <td>5 of 26</td> <td>9 of 26</td> <td>1 of 26</td> <td>3 of 26</td> <td>.474</td> <td>5-1</td> <td>85-33</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Minnesota 24-7 Coach: Don Shula
Key players: QB Bob Griese (1,422 yards, 17 TD), RB Larry Csonka (1,003 yards), Mercury Morris (954 yards), WR Paul Warfield, C Jim Langer, DE Bill Stanfill, S Jake Scott, S Dick Anderson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This team doesn't quite boast the same credentials as the celebrated '72 Dolphins, but it did enjoy much more lopsided postseason victories, winning by an average of 11.7 more points than its predecessor. Miami's offense dropped to fifth in the NFL in points and ninth in yards gained – down from No. 1 in each category in 1972. Larry Csonka and Mercury Morris combined for nearly 2,000 rushing yards, and while Bob Griese didn't throw much (Miami was last in the NFL in pass attempts), he did compile the No. 2 passer rating in the AFC. And special kudos to the pass D: The Dolphins allowed just five passing TDs while making 21 interceptions. The Super Bowl was much like the regular season: Griese attempted only seven passes (something tells us this strategy wouldn't fly in the modern NFL), completing six. <!---------------------INLINE TABLE (BEGIN)--------------------> <table id="inlinetable" target="new" align="left" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="550"> <tbody><tr style="background-color: rgb(236, 236, 236);" target="new" valign="top"> <td width="550"> STATISTICAL KEY: Pts: points scored; Pts: Points allowed; Avg.: Average; Diff.: Point differential; Rank Pts.: League ranking in points scored; Rank Yards: League ranking in yards gained; Rank Pts. All.: League ranking in points allowed; Rank Yds All.: League ranking in yards allowed; Opp. W-L: Combined winning percentage of opponents (includes games played against featured team); .500 +: Record against teams with record of .500 or better; Post. Score: Cumulative score in postseason games. Note: All statistics are regular season only. </td> </tr> </tbody></table> <!---------------------INLINE TABLE (END)-------------------->
 

dirty

EOG Master
#4
Re: ESPN Page 2's Super Bowl Team Rankings From #80-#1

<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"><tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"><td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]20.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1997 DENVER BRONCOS 12-4 (4-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>472</td> <td>29.5</td> <td>287</td> <td>17.9</td> <td>+185</td> <td>1 of 30</td> <td>1 of 30</td> <td>7 of 30</td> <td>5 of 30</td> <td>.494</td> <td>4-3</td> <td>111-72</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Green Bay 31-24 Coach: Mike Shanahan
Key players: QB John Elway (3,635 yards, 27 TD), RB Terrell Davis (1,750 yards), WR Rod Smith, TE Shannon Sharpe, C Tom Nalen, DE Neil Smith, LB Bill Romanowski, DB Tyrone Braxton</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
After 13 consecutive NFC victories in the Super Bowl, oddsmakers made Denver an 11?-point underdog. Little did they understand how much the emergence of Terrell Davis would help John Elway. The balanced Broncos ranked No. 1 in the NFL in points and offensive yardage, and its defense allowed the fifth-fewest yards in the league. One knock on this team is that it didn't win its division, despite having the second-best record in the AFC. But Denver toppled AFC West champion Kansas City in a divisional playoff game en route to its long-awaited first Super Bowl title.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]19.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1978 DALLAS COWBOYS 12-4 (2-1)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>384</td> <td>24.0</td> <td>208</td> <td>13.0</td> <td>+176</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>.504</td> <td>6-4</td> <td>86-55</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Lost to Pittsburgh 35-31 Coach: Tom Landry
Key players: QB Roger Staubach (3,190 yards, 25 TD), RB Tony Dorsett (1,325 yards), WR Tony Hill, WR Drew Pearson, TE Billy Joe Dupree, DT Randy White, DE Harvey Martin</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Our highest-ranked losing team checks in ahead of 22 Super Bowl winners, and a good case could be made to rate it even higher. The Cowboys ranked No. 1 in points scored and No. 3 in fewest points allowed, and they narrowly lost to one of the greatest teams in NFL history in the Super Bowl. They boasted a star-studded roster which included nine players named to the Pro Bowl and four future Hall of Famers. Tony Dorsett rushed for his second-highest yardage total, and Roger Staubach compiled his second-highest total for touchdown passes. Jackie Smith's third-quarter drop in the end zone led to Dallas settling for a field goal. What if …?
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]18.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1976 OAKLAND RAIDERS 13-1 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>350</td> <td>25.0</td> <td>237</td> <td>16.9</td> <td>+113</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>12 of 28</td> <td>18 of 28</td> <td>.469</td> <td>5-1</td> <td>80-42</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Minnesota 32-14 Coach: John Madden
Key players: QB Ken Stabler (2,737 yards, 27 TD), RB Mark van Eeghen (1,012 yards), WR Cliff Branch, WR Fred Biletnikoff, TE Dave Casper, OT Art Shell, OG Gene Upshaw, LB Phil Villapiano</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Not to bash on the legend of John Madden and his only Super Bowl champ, but this team wasn't quite as good as its 13-1 record indicates. True, the offense was a devastating mix of the long ball (Cliff Branch averaged over 24 yards on 46 catches) and grind-it-out running attack, but the defense had holes (18th in the NFL in yards allowed) and just one Pro Bowler. A less-than-impressive 113-point scoring differential means the Raiders pulled out a lot of squeakers – they won five games by four points or less – and their biggest win was 49-16 over the 0-14 expansion Bucs. An impressive Super Bowl win keeps them up high, but great teams win blowouts, not close games.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]17.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1993 DALLAS COWBOYS 12-4 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>376</td> <td>23.5</td> <td>229</td> <td>14.3</td> <td>+147</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>.500</td> <td>8-2</td> <td>95-51</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Buffalo 30-13 Coach: Jimmy Johnson
Key players: QB Troy Aikman (3,100 yards, 15 TD), RB Emmitt Smith (1,486 yards), WR Michael Irvin (1,330 yards), OT Erik Williams, OG Nate Newton, DT Russell Maryland, LB Ken Norton</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The '70s Steelers have their own wing at Canton, but it's hard to argue that the early '90s Cowboys aren't the most talented team of all time, with the devastating Aikman-Smith-Irvin trio working behind a dominant offensive line (three of the team's 11 Pro Bowlers). The Cowboys got off on the wrong foot, losing their first two games during Emmitt Smith's holdout, but rebounded to lose just twice more. Despite the holdout, Smith gained 1,900 yards from scrimmage and Troy Aikman recorded the highest passer rating of his career (99.0). All three of their postseason victories were by double figures, including wins over a young Brett Favre and the Steve Young-led Niners in the NFC title game.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]16.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1979 PITTSBURGH STEELERS 12-4 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>416</td> <td>26.0</td> <td>262</td> <td>16.4</td> <td>+154</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>5 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>.527</td> <td>7-3</td> <td>92-46</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Los Angeles Rams 31-19 Coach: Chuck Noll
Key players: QB Terry Bradshaw (3,724 yards, 26 TD), RB Franco Harris (1,186 yards), WR John Stallworth, WR Lynn Swann, C Mike Webster, DT Joe Greene, LB Jack Lambert, LB Jack Ham</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
How powerful was the last great Steel Curtain team? They were so good they dominated despite 25 interceptions by Terry Bradshaw (plus one more by a backup QB) and an amazing 26 lost fumbles. They were so powerful they still led the NFL in points and yards gained against a difficult schedule. They were so dominant that despite that league-leading total of 52 turnovers, they still ranked fifth in points allowed. However, the Steelers lose style points for 34-10 and 35-7 losses in the regular season and for letting a 9-7 opponent take the lead into the fourth quarter of the Super Bowl. Oh, and what if that Mike Renfro call hadn't been botched in the AFC Championship Game against the Oilers?
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]15.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1971 DALLAS COWBOYS 11-3 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>406</td> <td>29.0</td> <td>222</td> <td>15.9</td> <td>+184</td> <td>1 of 26</td> <td>1 of 26</td> <td>7 of 26</td> <td>3 of 26</td> <td>.416</td> <td>2-1</td> <td>58-18</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Miami 24-3 Coach: Tom Landry
Key players: QB Roger Staubach (1,882 yards, 104.8 QB rating), QB Craig Morton (1,131 yards), RB Duane Thomas, OT Rayfield Wright, LB Chuck Howley, DT Bob Lilly, CB Mel Renfro</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Cowboys and coach Tom Landry finally shook the "Next Year's Champions" tag with a roster that included eight future Hall of Famers. Roger Staubach compiled a career-best passer rating, and the Cowboys won their last seven regular-season games after Landry made Staubach the unquestioned starter over Craig Morton. The receiving game included two Hall of Famers, Lance Alworth and Mike Ditka, and an Olympic gold medal sprinter, Bob Hayes. Dallas boasted the three-headed monster of Duane Thomas, Calvin Hill and Walt Garrison at running back. The defense got stingier as the season wore on, allowing an average of six points in three postseason games and holding Miami to 185 yards in the Super Bowl.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]14.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1999 ST. LOUIS RAMS 13-3 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>526</td> <td>32.9</td> <td>242</td> <td>15.1</td> <td>+284</td> <td>1 of 31</td> <td>1 of 31</td> <td>4 of 31</td> <td>6 of 31</td> <td>.430</td> <td>3-2</td> <td>83-59</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Tennessee 23-16 Coach: Dick Vermeil
Key players: QB Kurt Warner (4,353 yards, 41 TD), RB Marshall Faulk (2,429 total yards), WR Isaac Bruce, WR Torry Holt, OT Orlando Pace, DE Kevin Carter, DE Grant Wistrom, CB Todd Lyght</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Unheralded Kurt Warner stepped in for the injured Trent Green and compiled the seventh-highest passer rating in NFL history to win NFL MVP. Presto. The Greatest Show on Turf was born, and the Rams went on to lead the NFL in points and yards gained for three consecutive seasons. Marshall Faulk had 1,381 rushing yards and 1,048 receiving yards. Isaac Bruce, Az Hakim and rookie Torry Holt combined for more than 2,600 receiving yards and 26 touchdowns. St. Louis' defense allowed the fewest rushing yards in the league, but it ranked a dubious 24th in passing yards allowed (in part because teams had to pass in playing from behind). The knock on this team was its easy schedule. It went 3-2 against teams .500 or better, and they played two close postseason games.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]13.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1975 PITTSBURGH STEELERS 12-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>373</td> <td>26.6</td> <td>162</td> <td>11.6</td> <td>+211</td> <td>5 of 26</td> <td>7 of 26</td> <td>2 of 26</td> <td>4 of 26</td> <td>.469</td> <td>4-2</td> <td>65-37</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Dallas 21-17 Coach: Chuck Noll
Key players: QB Terry Bradshaw (2,055 yards, 18 TD), RB Franco Harris, WR Lynn Swann, DT Joe Greene, DE L.C. Greenwood, LB Jack Lambert, LB Jack Ham, CB Mel Blount, S Glen Edwards</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Terrible Towel was born in '75 as the Steelers established a dynasty. Terry Bradshaw had the highest passer rating of his career, and Franco Harris established a career high with 1,246 rushing yards. The Steelers won 11 consecutive games at one point, until losing the regular-season finale after clinching home-field advantage through the AFC playoffs. Speaking of the number 11, that's how many Pittsburgh players were selected to the Pro Bowl – half the team's starters. The Steelers held their opponents to 10 points or fewer 10 times in 17 total games. Both Pittsburgh losses came against teams with winning records. In other words: believe the legend.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]12.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1998 DENVER BRONCOS 14-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>501</td> <td>31.3</td> <td>309</td> <td>19.3</td> <td>+192</td> <td>2 of 30</td> <td>3 of 30</td> <td>8 of 30</td> <td>11 of 30</td> <td>.535</td> <td>7-2</td> <td>95-32</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Atlanta 34-19 Coach: Mike Shanahan
Key players: QB John Elway (2,806 yards, 22 TD), RB Terrell Davis (2,008 yards, 23 TD), WR Rod Smith (1,222 yards), WR Ed McCaffrey, TE Shannon Sharpe, C Tom Nalen, S Steve Atwater</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
John Elway compiled the best passer rating of his career, and Terrell Davis became the only NFL player to rush for 2,000 yards and 20 touchdowns in the same season. Add two 1,000-yard receivers and a Pro Bowl tight end, and you've got a recipe for an offense that averaged more than 30 points in the regular season and postseason. Both of Denver's losses came after it had already clinched home-field advantage through the AFC playoffs with a 13-0 start. The Broncos became the first AFC team to win consecutive Super Bowls in 19 years.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]11.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1994 SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS 13-3 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>505</td> <td>31.6</td> <td>296</td> <td>18.5</td> <td>+209</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>6 of 28</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>.473</td> <td>4-2</td> <td>131-69</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat San Diego 49-26 Coach: George Seifert
Key players: QB Steve Young (3,969 yards, 35 TD), WR Jerry Rice (112 rec, 1,499 yards), RB Ricky Watters, TE Brent Jones, OG Jesse Sapolu, DT Dana Stubblefield, CB Deion Sanders</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
If God came to us and said, "You have to coach a game against evil Cyborgs. The survival of mankind is at stake. You have to pick one quarterback from one year of his career. Who do you pick?" We'll take Steve Young, 1994. His stats look made up (70 percent completion, 35 TDs, 10 INTs, 8.6 yards per attempt, 112.8 QB rating, 7 rushing TDs, 6 TD passes in the Super Bowl). Behind Young, this team could not be stopped: Over its final 13 games (including the playoffs), it scored more than 40 six times and less than 30 just twice, and one of those was the season finale – which the Niners lost – when Young and Jerry Rice were benched after the first quarter. Alas, this team has one huge scar: a 40-8 loss to the Eagles in Week 5. It's enough to slide them down. Of course, maybe we made a mistake.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]10.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1991 WASHINGTON REDSKINS 14-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>485</td> <td>30.3</td> <td>224</td> <td>14.0</td> <td>+261</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>.504</td> <td>8-2</td> <td>102-41</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Buffalo 37-24 Coach: Joe Gibbs
Key players: QB Mark Rypien (3,564, 28 TD), RB Earnest Byner (1,048 yards), WR Gary Clark
(70 rec, 1,340 yards), WR Art Monk, OT Jim Lachey, OG Mark Schlereth, CB Darrell Green</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
If you're a Redskins fan, we know you're angry. And know what? You may be right. There is a case that this isn't just the greatest Redskins team ever, but the greatest of any team. Their point differential (+261) is tied for second-best since the 16-game schedule began. They lost two games by a combined five points, and one of those came in the final game. They dominated the playoffs. They recorded 50 sacks and allowed just nine. They played a tough schedule. But two things prevent a higher ranking: While Washington ran the ball a lot, it wasn't a great running team (just 18th in average yards per carry). And while Mark Rypien didn't have exactly a fluke season, he certainly had a career year. And we're having a little trouble getting past ranking a team with Rypien higher than 10th.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]9.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]2004 NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS 14-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>437</td> <td>27.3</td> <td>260</td> <td>16.3</td> <td>+177</td> <td>4 of 32</td> <td>7 of 32</td> <td>2 of 32</td> <td>9 of 32</td> <td>.492</td> <td>9-1</td> <td>85-51</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Philadelphia 24-21 Coach: Bill Belichick
Key players: QB Tom Brady (3,692, 28 TD), RB Corey Dillon (1,635 yards), WR Deion Branch, WR David Givens, DE Richard Seymour, LB Willie McGinest, LB Tedy Bruschi, S Rodney Harrison</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Critics have been reluctant to call this Pats team an all-time great champ. It has been maligned for its lack of star power and questioned for not crushing opponents on a regular basis. But there is no denying its accomplishments. The Pats won 31 of 33 games at one point. The stats are strong on both sides of the ball, the two losses were on the road to 15-1 Pittsburgh and by one point to Miami, and they were 9-1 against .500 or better teams. But most impressive is a great playoff run: 20-3 over a 12-4 Colts team that had scored 522 points; 41-27 over those one-loss Steelers; and 24-21 over a 13-3 Eagles team (and Philly scored late to make it close). Tom Brady is more than a "clutch" QB: he's a great QB (28 TD, 14 INT). Throw in a dash of Belichick, and this underrated team jumps into our top 10.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]8.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1986 NEW YORK GIANTS 14-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>371</td> <td>23.2</td> <td>236</td> <td>14.8</td> <td>+135</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>10 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>.475</td> <td>6-1</td> <td>105-23</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Denver 39-20 Coach: Bill Parcells
Key players: QB Phil Simms (3,487 yards, 21 TD), RB Joe Morris (1,749 total yards, 15 TD), TE Mark Bavaro (1,001 yards), DE Leonard Marshall, NT Jim Burt, LB Lawrence Taylor, LB Harry Carson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
For those of you who think we have this team ranked too high, we offer five words: Lawrence Taylor in his prime. Taylor, who "changed the way defense is played," according to John Madden, recorded a career-high 20? sacks and was named NFL MVP. The Giants' closest playoff victory was 17 points, in a shutout over the Redskins. Offensively, Phil Simms didn't have a good season statistically, throwing more interceptions than touchdown passes. But Simms played well on the biggest stage, setting a Super Bowl record by completing 88 percent of his passes. Joe Morris topped the 1,300-yard mark in rushing for the second consecutive season, and Mark Bavaro went for career highs in catches and receiving yards. We'll spare you the hyperbole about brainpower, but don't forget Bill Parcells and Bill Belichick were on the same staff here.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]7.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1972 MIAMI DOLPHINS 14-0 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>385</td> <td>27.5</td> <td>171</td> <td>12.2</td> <td>+214</td> <td>1 of 26</td> <td>1 of 26</td> <td>1 of 26</td> <td>1 of 26</td> <td>.367</td> <td>5-0</td> <td>55-38</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Washington 14-7 Coach: Don Shula
Key players: QB Bob Griese (638 yards), QB Earl Morrall (1,360 yards), RB Larry Csonka, RB Mercury Morris, WR Paul Warfield, OG Larry Little, LB Nick Buoniconti, S Jake Scott</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
What in the name of Garo Yepremian is going on here? How can the only NFL champion with a perfect record be ranked this far down on the totem pole of NFL greatness? Yes, we realize that the Dolphins are the only Super Bowl team to boast the league's top-ranked offense and defense, based on both points and yards. We're also well aware that Miami had nine Pro Bowlers and six future Hall of Famers. However, the Dolphins played the easiest schedule of all 80 Super Bowl participants, and their passing game was ordinary. All three of Miami's postseason games were decided by seven points or fewer. We have no choice: Undefeated … and No. 7.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]6.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1996 GREEN BAY PACKERS 13-3 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>456</td> <td>28.5</td> <td>210</td> <td>13.1</td> <td>+246</td> <td>1 of 30</td> <td>5 of 30</td> <td>1 of 30</td> <td>1 of 30</td> <td>.508</td> <td>5-3</td> <td>100-48</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat New England 35-21 Coach: Mike Holmgren
Key players: QB Brett Favre (3,899 yards, 39 TD), RB Edgar Bennett, WR Antonio Freeman, TE Keith Jackson, C Frank Winters, DE Reggie White, DE Sean Jones, S LeRoy Butler, S Eugene Robinson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The '96 Packers are one of two postmerger Super Bowl participants to lead the NFL in points scored while allowing the fewest points. Reggie White anchored a defense that also allowed the fewest yards in the league, had more than twice as many interceptions (26) as touchdown passes allowed (12) and limited opponents to a league-best 5.41 yards per passing attempt. All three of the Packers' losses came on the road, and its closest postseason game was 14 points. Surprisingly, Green Bay had neither a 1,000-yard rusher nor a 1,000-yard receiver. But it did have Brett Favre in his prime and five players who gained more than 500 yards from scrimmage. Favre, who won the MVP award, threw touchdown passes to nine different receivers. Not to be overlooked was Desmond Howard, who broke the NFL single-season record for punt-return yardage and was named Super Bowl MVP.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]5.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1984 SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS 15-1 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>475</td> <td>29.7</td> <td>227</td> <td>14.2</td> <td>+248</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>10 of 28</td> <td>.457</td> <td>5-1</td> <td>82-26</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Miami 38-16 Coach: Bill Walsh
Key players: QB Joe Montana (3,630, 28 TD), RB Wendell Tyler (1,262 yards), RB Roger Craig (1,324 total yards), WR Dwight Clark, OG Randy Cross, LB Keena Turner, CB Ronnie Lott</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Like the Bears the following season, this team came up one victory shy of a perfect season en route to its Super Bowl championship. Unlike the Bears, the 49ers' defeat was by a mere field goal, and San Francisco went on to manhandle a dominant offense in the Super Bowl. Joe Montana was entering his prime and enjoyed the first of three seasons with a passer rating higher than 100. Montana's top four passing targets combined for 204 receptions and 23 touchdowns. Wendell Tyler had the best rushing season of his career. The Niners had 10 players named to the Pro Bowl, five on each side of the ball – including all four members of the secondary. This team also had a wealth of veteran talent with the likes of Gary Johnson, Jack Reynolds and Russ Francis. So why isn't this team ranked even higher? Largely because it wasn't even the best team in 49ers history, as San Francisco would add Jerry Rice, John Taylor, Brent Jones and Steve Young in subsequent seasons.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]4.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1992 DALLAS COWBOYS 13-3 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>409</td> <td>25.6</td> <td>243</td> <td>15.2</td> <td>+166</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>5 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>.426</td> <td>4-2</td> <td>116-47</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Buffalo 52-17 Coach: Jimmy Johnson
Key players: QB Troy Aikman (3,445 yards, 23 TD), RB Emmitt Smith (1,713 yards), WR Michael Irvin (1,396 yards), TE Jay Novacek, OG Nate Newton, C Mark Stepnoski, LB Ken Norton</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
The Cowboys returned to glory in a big way, forcing a Super Bowl-record nine turnovers in one of the big game's biggest blowouts. This team boasted the NFL's all-time leading rusher, Emmitt Smith, behind arguably the league's best-ever offensive line. Dallas played defense, too, allowing the fewest yards in the league. Smith proved his 1991 breakout season was no fluke by topping 2,000 yards from scrimmage. Troy Aikman threw for career highs in yardage and touchdowns. The only knock against this team is its soft schedule, which is the sixth-easiest of any Super Bowl participant since the AFL-NFL merger. Although this team didn't have the best record in the NFC, it toppled another powerhouse, 14-2 San Francisco, in the NFC Championship Game. The Super Bowl rout served as the culmination of the rebuilding project of Jerry Jones and Jimmy Johnson.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]3.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1978 PITTSBURGH STEELERS 14-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>356</td> <td>22.3</td> <td>195</td> <td>12.2</td> <td>+161</td> <td>5 of 28</td> <td>8 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>.449</td> <td>7-2</td> <td>102-46</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Dallas 35-31 Coach: Chuck Noll
Key players: QB Terry Bradshaw (2,961 yards, 28 TD), RB Franco Harris, WR John Stallworth, WR Lynn Swann, C Mike Webster, DT Joe Greene, LB Jack Lambert, LB Jack Ham, CB Mel Blount</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
This season would represent the zenith of a dynasty that captured four Super Bowl championships in six years. Pittsburgh ultimately would send nine players and its head coach to the Hall of Fame. Most of them were in their prime as the Steelers blasted their way through the defending AFC champion Broncos and the upstart Oilers in the playoffs. Pittsburgh then became the first franchise to win three Super Bowls, by defeating an excellent Cowboys team. Pittsburgh's two losses were by a total of 10 points, and both defeats came against playoff qualifiers. Terry Bradshaw led the AFC in passer rating, averaging nearly eight yards per attempt with a career high in touchdown passes. Workhorse Franco Harris led the AFC in rushing attempts. Since rule changes opened up the passing game in 1978, only the 2000 Ravens allowed fewer points during the regular season than this edition of the Steelers. In a secondary that boasted Pro Bowlers Mel Blount and Donnie Shell, former quarterback Tony Dungy led the team with six interceptions.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]2.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1985 CHICAGO BEARS 15-1 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>456</td> <td>28.5</td> <td>198</td> <td>12.4</td> <td>+258</td> <td>2 of 28</td> <td>7 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>.473</td> <td>7-1</td> <td>91-10</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat New England 46-10 Coach: Mike Ditka
Key players: QB Jim McMahon (2,392 yards, 15 TD), RB Walter Payton (1,551 yards), OT Jimbo Covert, DE Richard Dent, DT Dan Hampton, LB Mike Singletary, LB Otis Wilson, S Dave Duerson</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
Da Bears were great. But not quite The Greatest. Chicago won its first championship in 22 years behind one of the most fearsome defenses in NFL history. It was a defining season for one of the game's finest players, Walter Payton. A rookie defensive lineman from Clemson, William Perry, became a cult hero by scoring three touchdowns in the regular season and another in the Super Bowl. Richard Dent helped anchor the vaunted "46" defense with a league-high 17 sacks and went on to win Super Bowl MVP honors. A powerful rushing attack built around Payton mitigated a passing attack that recorded as many interceptions as touchdown passes. Payton was also the team's runaway leader in receptions, and he recorded 2,000 yards from scrimmage for the third consecutive season. The Bears won 14 games by double digits, including three dominant postseason performances. Chicago overcame the distraction of season-long holdouts by Todd Bell and Al Harris, both defensive starters in 1984, inserting Dave Duerson and Wilber Marshall into their spots. The Bears had nine players named to the Pro Bowl and certainly never lacked confidence, supposedly filming the video for "Super Bowl Shuffle" the day after the team's only loss of the season. And if you want to know why they're only No. 2, click here for a full explanation of our methodology.
<table class="tablehead" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="100%"> <tbody><tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">[FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana, sans-serif]1.[/FONT] [FONT=Arial Black,Helvetic,Verdana,sans-serif]1989 SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS 14-2 (3-0)[/FONT] </td> </tr> <tr class="colhead" valign="top"> <td>Pts</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Pts
All.</td> <td>Avg</td> <td>Diff.</td> <td>Rank
Pts</td> <td>Rank
Yards</td> <td>Rank
Pts All.</td> <td>Rank
Yds All.</td> <td>Opp.
W-L</td> <td>.500+</td> <td>Post.
Score</td> </tr> <tr class="oddrow" valign="top"> <td>442</td> <td>27.6</td> <td>253</td> <td>15.8</td> <td>+189</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>1 of 28</td> <td>3 of 28</td> <td>4 of 28</td> <td>.457</td> <td>7-2</td> <td>126-26</td> </tr> <tr class="evenrow" valign="top"> <td colspan="12">Super Bowl: Beat Denver 55-10 Coach: George Seifert
Key players: QB Joe Montana (3,521 yards, 26 TD), RB Roger Craig (1,527 total yards), WR Jerry Rice (1,483 yards, 17 TD), WR John Taylor, OG Guy McIntyre, LB Charles Haley, S Ronnie Lott</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
What, you want to bet against Joe Montana and Jerry Rice? This team gets our nod due to its excellence on both sides of the ball, mind-boggling statistics and perhaps the most dominant postseason run in NFL history. This team gave us Montana, Rice, Roger Craig, Ronnie Lott and Charles Haley in their primes. It also boasted the largest margin of victory in Super Bowl history, scoring 55 points against the NFL's best scoring defense.<!---------------------INLINE TABLE (BEGIN)-------------------->
<table id="inlinetable" target="new" align="right" border="0" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1" width="240"> <tbody><tr><th colspan="1" style="background-color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="new"> <center>VIDEO EXTRA</center></th> </tr><tr style="background-color: rgb(236, 236, 236);" target="new" valign="top"> <td width="240"> Roger Craig speaks about playing for the 1989 San Francisco 49ers
</td> </tr> </tbody></table> <!---------------------INLINE TABLE (END)-------------------->This team had a future Hall of Famer, Steve Young, as its backup quarterback. Montana recorded the third-highest single-season passer rating in NFL history – more than 20 points higher than the No. 2 mark that season. Rice was unstoppable, as he and John Taylor teamed for 142 receptions, 2,560 yards and 27 touchdowns.
Former defensive coordinator George Seifert seemed to push all the right buttons in his first season at the helm, following Bill Walsh's retirement. His offensive coordinator was Mike Holmgren, who would go on to guide three Super Bowl participants as head coach. San Francisco won 13 games by double digits, including playoff scores of 41-13, 30-3 and 55-10. The 49ers also went 8-0 on the road. Their two losses came by a total of five points, and both of those opponents won at least 10 games. To date, only three members of this team are enshrined in the Hall of Fame, which speaks to the value of a tremendous supporting cast that included Brent Jones, Tom Rathman, Jesse Sapolu, Michael Carter, Pierce Holt, Kevin ***an, Keena Turner, Eric Wright, Tim McKyer, Matt Millen and Bill Romanowski.
<!---------------------INLINE TABLE (BEGIN)--------------------> STATISTICAL KEY: Pts: points scored; Pts: Points allowed; Avg.: Average; Diff.: Point differential; Rank Pts.: League ranking in points scored; Rank Yards: League ranking in yards gained; Rank Pts. All.: League ranking in points allowed; Rank Yds All.: League ranking in yards allowed; Opp. W-L: Combined winning percentage of opponents (includes games played against featured team); .500 +: Record against teams with record of .500 or better; Post. Score: Cumulative score in postseason games. Note: All statistics are regular season only.



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