My Monday blog

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#1
I watched every minute of all eight NBA postseason games this past weekend.

Pro basketball and college basketball are classified as the same sport but they are completely different games.

Where to start?

In the NBA, great offense beats great defense.

The best offensive players on the top NBA teams are virtually unstoppable.

The rule book and more specifically, the interpretation of the rules, tilts the game in favor of the league's superstar players.

In the name of entertainment, NBA officials grant players like James Harden, Kevin Durant and Giannis Antetokounmpo the benefit of the doubt.

It's no secret the league's best players benefit from the most favorable calls.

When the most prolific scorers receive cover from NBA officials, it becomes impossible to deny scoring opportunities from the field or the free-throw line.

Figuratively speaking, three of the game's all-time greats -- Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant and LeBron James -- often played with a whistle in their mouth, calling fouls on their opponents like playground hoopsters.

Defense wins championships but offense sells merchandise, produces television ratings and drives advertising revenue.

And the collective powers of the NBA know it.

Four seasons ago, NBA games averaged 200 points per game.

This season, NBA teams combined to score more than 222 points per game.

The offensive skill level of the world's best players is off the charts compared to their college counterparts.

Show me an open NBA shooter and I'll show you an automatic two or three points.

In contrast, open shots in the college game are routinely missed and challenged shots rarely find the bottom of the net.

Scoring in the pro game is completely different than the college game, largely due to the length of the game and the difference in shot clocks.

An NBA contest spans 48 minutes with 24 seconds allowed for every shot.

The college game is 20% shorter (40 minutes) with a shot clock (30 seconds) lasting 25% longer.

The average number of possessions per game for an NBA team this season was 100, the average number of possessions for a Division I college team was fewer than 68 and the average number of possessions per team in a game involving national champion Virginia was fewer than 60.

Division I college basketball games this season produced 143.8 points per contest.

Inferior teams have a much better chance to engineer an upset in the briefer college game.

Collegiate postseason tournaments, which feature a single-elimination element compared to the NBA's longer Best-of-7 playoff format, also favor pesky underdogs with a loud bark.

And here's one of the biggest differences between the pro and college game that most analysts are reluctant to discuss: The absence of the American-born white player in the NBA.

Eighty players landed starting spots this past weekend when the 2019 NBA playoffs debuted.

Only two of the 80 starters were American-born white players and they combined to score a grand total of 18 points in 53 minutes of action.

J.J. Redick (age 34) and Joe Harris (age 27) are members of a dying fraternity whose charter, if the current trend continues, will soon expire.

In the most recent NBA All-Star Game, none of the players and only the head coaches -- Michael Malone and Mike Budenholzer -- were American-born white men.

An oft-injured Kevin Love may be remembered as the NBA's last "Great White Hope."

Born in Santa Monica, California, Love represents a vanishing breed of American player who struggles to find a place in the league.

Love "rested" for four of Cleveland's final five games this season despite appearing in only 22 games this season for the hapless Cavaliers.

Meantime, the white American in college basketball is alive and well.

In last Monday night's championship game, three of the top five players on the court were white players produced in the States.

Virginia guards Kyle Guy and Ty Jerome and Texas Tech's Matt Mooney were valuable players in leading their teams to the title game.

None of the three will ever make an NBA All-Star Game appearance.

Yet Kyle Guy was named the Final Four's Most Outstanding Player.

Guy joined fellow white Americans Kyle Singler (2010), Luke Hancock (2013), Ryan Arcidiacono (2016) and Donte DiVincenzo (2018) to win the prestigious award over the past decade.

Arcidiacono and DiVincenzo are bench players in the NBA while Singler was forced to play overseas last season in Spain.

Hancock went undrafted and never played a single minute at the NBA level.

And therein lies the biggest difference between pro basketball and college basketball.

White men born in the States can star at the collegiate level but no longer hold a significant place on the NBA hardwood.

It's an unmistakable black-and-white issue for all to see, yet a delicate topic which rarely gets addressed.

White Americans can own the team, manage the team or coach the team, but white American-born players in the NBA are disappearing faster than the mid-range jumper.
 
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skinny

EOG Enthusiast
#2
NBA regular season lots of points, NBA postseason not so much.

Playoff games last 2 days, unders went 8-0.
 
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#3
I watched every minute of all eight NBA postseason games this past weekend.

Pro basketball and college basketball are classified as the same sport but they are completely different games.

Where to start?

In the NBA, great offense beats great defense.

The best offensive players on the top NBA teams are virtually unstoppable.

The rule book and more specifically, the interpretation of the rules, tilts the game in favor of the league's superstar players.

In the name of entertainment, NBA officials grant players like James Harden, Kevin Durant and Giannis Antetokounmpo the benefit of the doubt.

It's no secret the league's best players benefit from the most favorable calls.

When the most prolific scorers receive cover from NBA officials, it becomes impossible to deny scoring opportunities from the field or the free-throw line.

Figuratively speaking, three of the game's all-time greats -- Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant and LeBron James -- often played with a whistle in their mouth, calling fouls on their opponents like playground hoopsters.

Defense wins championships but offense sells merchandise, produces television ratings and drives advertising revenue.

And the collective powers of the NBA know it.

Four seasons ago, NBA games averaged 200 points per game.

This season, NBA teams combined to score more than 222 points per game.

The offensive skill level of the world's best players is off the charts compared to their college counterparts.

Show me an open NBA shooter and I'll show you an automatic two or three points.

In contrast, open shots in the college game are routinely missed and challenged shots rarely find the bottom of the net.

Scoring in the pro game is completely different than the college game, largely due to the length of the game and the difference in shot clocks.

An NBA contest spans 48 minutes with 24 seconds allowed for every shot.

The college game is 20% shorter (40 minutes) with a shot clock (30 seconds) lasting 25% longer.

The average number of possessions per game for an NBA team this season was 100, the average number of possessions for a Division I college team was fewer than 68 and the average number of possessions per team in a game involving national champion Virginia was fewer than 60.

Division I college basketball games this season produced 143.8 points per contest.

Inferior teams have a much better chance to engineer an upset in the briefer college game.

Collegiate postseason tournaments, which feature a single-elimination element compared to the NBA's longer Best-of-7 playoff format, also favor pesky underdogs with a loud bark.

And here's one of the biggest differences between the pro and college game that most analysts are reluctant to discuss: The absence of the American-born white player in the NBA.

Eighty players landed starting spots this past weekend when the 2019 NBA playoffs debuted.

Only two of the 80 starters were American-born white players and they combined to score a grand total of 18 points in 53 minutes of action.

J.J. Redick (age 34) and Joe Harris (age 27) are members of a dying fraternity whose charter, if the current trend continues, will soon expire.

In the most recent NBA All-Star Game, none of the players and only the head coaches -- Michael Malone and Mike Budenholzer -- were American-born white men.

An oft-injured Kevin Love may be remembered as the NBA's last "Great White Hope."

Born in Santa Monica, California, Love represents a vanishing breed of American player who struggles to find a place in the league.

Love "rested" for four of Cleveland's final five games this season despite appearing in only 22 games this season for the hapless Cavaliers.

Meantime, the white American in college basketball is alive and well.

In last Monday night's championship game, three of the top five players on the court were white players produced in the States.

Virginia guards Kyle Guy and Ty Jerome and Texas Tech's Matt Mooney were valuable players in leading their respective teams to the title game.

None of the three will ever make an NBA All-Star Game appearance.

Yet Kyle Guy was named the Final Four's Most Outstanding Player.

Guy joined fellow white Americans Kyle Singler (2010), Luke Hancock (2013), Ryan Arcidiacono (2016) and Donte DiVincenzo (2018) to win the prestigious award over the past decade.

Arcidiacono and DiVincenzo are bench players in the NBA while Singler was forced to play overseas last season in Spain.

Hancock went undrafted and never played a single minute at the NBA level.

And therein lies the biggest difference between pro basketball and college basketball.

White men born in the States can star at the collegiate level but no longer hold a significant place on the NBA hardwood.

It's an unmistakable black-and-white issue for all to see, yet a delicate topic which rarely gets addressed.

White Americans can own the team, manage the team or coach the team, but white American-born players in the NBA are disappearing faster than the mid-range jumper.
whites are playing volleyball, open volleyball had 100 people open basketball 10 feet away had 3 people at my health club
 
#4
Go to any D1 university that has volleyball and basketball. 90 pct of the best verticals in athletic dept belong to the volleyball team
 
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#6
I watched every minute of all eight NBA postseason games this past weekend.

Pro basketball and college basketball are classified as the same sport but they are completely different games.

Where to start?

In the NBA, great offense beats great defense.

The best offensive players on the top NBA teams are virtually unstoppable.

The rule book and more specifically, the interpretation of the rules, tilts the game in favor of the league's superstar players.

In the name of entertainment, NBA officials grant players like James Harden, Kevin Durant and Giannis Antetokounmpo the benefit of the doubt.

It's no secret the league's best players benefit from the most favorable calls.

When the most prolific scorers receive cover from NBA officials, it becomes impossible to deny scoring opportunities from the field or the free-throw line.

Figuratively speaking, three of the game's all-time greats -- Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant and LeBron James -- often played with a whistle in their mouth, calling fouls on their opponents like playground hoopsters.

Defense wins championships but offense sells merchandise, produces television ratings and drives advertising revenue.

And the collective powers of the NBA know it.

Four seasons ago, NBA games averaged 200 points per game.

This season, NBA teams combined to score more than 222 points per game.

The offensive skill level of the world's best players is off the charts compared to their college counterparts.

Show me an open NBA shooter and I'll show you an automatic two or three points.

In contrast, open shots in the college game are routinely missed and challenged shots rarely find the bottom of the net.

Scoring in the pro game is completely different than the college game, largely due to the length of the game and the difference in shot clocks.

An NBA contest spans 48 minutes with 24 seconds allowed for every shot.

The college game is 20% shorter (40 minutes) with a shot clock (30 seconds) lasting 25% longer.

The average number of possessions per game for an NBA team this season was 100, the average number of possessions for a Division I college team was fewer than 68 and the average number of possessions per team in a game involving national champion Virginia was fewer than 60.

Division I college basketball games this season produced 143.8 points per contest.

Inferior teams have a much better chance to engineer an upset in the briefer college game.

Collegiate postseason tournaments, which feature a single-elimination element compared to the NBA's longer Best-of-7 playoff format, also favor pesky underdogs with a loud bark.

And here's one of the biggest differences between the pro and college game that most analysts are reluctant to discuss: The absence of the American-born white player in the NBA.

Eighty players landed starting spots this past weekend when the 2019 NBA playoffs debuted.

Only two of the 80 starters were American-born white players and they combined to score a grand total of 18 points in 53 minutes of action.

J.J. Redick (age 34) and Joe Harris (age 27) are members of a dying fraternity whose charter, if the current trend continues, will soon expire.

In the most recent NBA All-Star Game, none of the players and only the head coaches -- Michael Malone and Mike Budenholzer -- were American-born white men.

An oft-injured Kevin Love may be remembered as the NBA's last "Great White Hope."

Born in Santa Monica, California, Love represents a vanishing breed of American player who struggles to find a place in the league.

Love "rested" for four of Cleveland's final five games this season despite appearing in only 22 games this season for the hapless Cavaliers.

Meantime, the white American in college basketball is alive and well.

In last Monday night's championship game, three of the top five players on the court were white players produced in the States.

Virginia guards Kyle Guy and Ty Jerome and Texas Tech's Matt Mooney were valuable players in leading their respective teams to the title game.

None of the three will ever make an NBA All-Star Game appearance.

Yet Kyle Guy was named the Final Four's Most Outstanding Player.

Guy joined fellow white Americans Kyle Singler (2010), Luke Hancock (2013), Ryan Arcidiacono (2016) and Donte DiVincenzo (2018) to win the prestigious award over the past decade.

Arcidiacono and DiVincenzo are bench players in the NBA while Singler was forced to play overseas last season in Spain.

Hancock went undrafted and never played a single minute at the NBA level.

And therein lies the biggest difference between pro basketball and college basketball.

White men born in the States can star at the collegiate level but no longer hold a significant place on the NBA hardwood.

It's an unmistakable black-and-white issue for all to see, yet a delicate topic which rarely gets addressed.

White Americans can own the team, manage the team or coach the team, but white American-born players in the NBA are disappearing faster than the mid-range jumper.
Jk, talk abt how you and Magic Johnson wanted to fire D Antoni from the Lakers 4 yrs ago, That didn't age well
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#7
Never liked Mike D'Antoni.

One-way coach whose only goal is to outscore the competition.

Houston assistant coach Jeff Bzdelik was hired to focus on the team's defense.

D'Antoni, with the win over Utah on Sunday night, improved to 44-44 in 88 postseason games.

His teams have never appeared in the NBA Finals.
 
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John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#8
By the way, Mike's brother, Dan D'Antoni, employs the same focus on offense as Mike in the role of head coach at Marshall University.

Dan D'Antoni is 96-77 in five seasons at Marshall.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#10
NBA regular season lots of points, NBA postseason not so much.

Playoff games last 2 days, unders went 8-0.

Interesting to note: The four fastest-paced teams (Atlanta, New Orleans, Sacramento and the Los Angeles Lakers) in the NBA this season did not qualify for the postseason.
 

jimmythegreek

The opening odds start here
#16
A good number earned you a push.

Good work, Jimmy.
Didnt bet it John. Only went the over 11.5 Greek freak rebound route -130. Figured the game would be a blowout even without Blake which steered me off the 29.5 giannis points -130, as he departed with 3:00 left in the 3rd and the Bucks up 45.
 

kane

Railbird is a past posting pos
#18
Excellent blog John, very well written and thought out, one of your best. The influx of foreign talent over the years has really made the NBA a world wide thing, it's what the league wanted, to spread across the entire globe. And you're right about college and pro being totally different, guys like Adam Morrison, Bobby Hurley, and Jimmer Fredette were great college players, none of them could play in the NBA though
 

bishqqq

EOG Addicted
#25
NBA is terrible to watch..........1 on 1 isolation....dribble dribble shoot.......betting on it is very difficult for me........too many random results / too many 20 point plus blown leads........totals are beatable . .........some of you gents can beat the nba.......i cant & focus energy on other easier opportunities.
 
#26
Had a 2nd half bet on the Celtics down 7, game 1, to essentially win the game. The Celtics got outplayed in the first half, but had a 22-5 run in the first 9-10 minutes or so of the third Q.

Despite having a winning bet, I was dismayed and disgusted at how pathetic the Pacers were in the 3Q, ending up with 8 points in the 3Q.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#27
Question: How did the Raptors hit the Magic with a 22-2 run spanning the second and third quarters yet still lose at home?

Answer: It's the NBA.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#28
Had a 2nd half bet on the Celtics down 7, game 1, to essentially win the game. The Celtics got outplayed in the first half, but had a 22-5 run in the first 9-10 minutes or so of the third Q.

Despite having a winning bet, I was dismayed and disgusted at how pathetic the Pacers were in the 3Q, ending up with 8 points in the 3Q.
I'm never dismayed or disgusted after winning a bet.

Quite the opposite, in fact.
 
#30
Had a 2nd half bet on the Celtics down 7, game 1, to essentially win the game. The Celtics got outplayed in the first half, but had a 22-5 run in the first 9-10 minutes or so of the third Q.

Despite having a winning bet, I was dismayed and disgusted at how pathetic the Pacers were in the 3Q, ending up with 8 points in the 3Q.
They don't have anyone that can create his own shot. Morris/smart switch off and on vs bogey and Indiana has Collison playing his heart out with no offensive talent outside of 12 feet wide open.
I will take all your winning tickets you are in dismay over and gladly trade you some huge equity losers anytime you'd like sir.

I certainly don't push agendas onto anyone but I think giving Kyle Korvers open letter regarding white privilege is a really decent read. Certainly worth the google search.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#33
JK left out the half breeds that are White, Klay Thompson, Forrest Griffin among others

Tough to classify some players.

I wasn't sure about the Lopez twins.

Turns out, both parents were born in foreign countries that begin with a "C" and end with an "a."

Dad was born in Cuba, mom was born in California.

I'll be here all week.
 
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John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#34
They don't have anyone that can create his own shot. Morris/smart switch off and on vs bogey and Indiana has Collison playing his heart out with no offensive talent outside of 12 feet wide open.
I will take all your winning tickets you are in dismay over and gladly trade you some huge equity losers anytime you'd like sir.

I certainly don't push agendas onto anyone but I think giving Kyle Korvers open letter regarding white privilege is a really decent read. Certainly worth the google search.

Thanks for the heads-up, Drink.

I thought Korver's essay was more about white guilt than white privilege.

He claimed white people are responsible for the sins of their country's forefathers.

Korver even mentioned the controversial topic of "reparations."

Wonder if NBA superstars will share in the "reparations" pool?

Come to think of it, some of those black NBA superstars came from families of considerable wealth (think Steph Curry, Klay Thompson, Austin Rivers and Larry Nance, Jr.).
 
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