Words that are spelled the same but....

Wilson

EOG Dedicated
#1
Lead

Lead

Spelled the same, pronounced differently with different meanings. How many of these are there?

There is life outside of football guys.
 

Wilson

EOG Dedicated
#4
Re: Words that are spelled the same but....

Good ones Mr Ego.

I got the idea last night while watching Polar Express, the conductor stamped the little girl's ticket with the word lead and she misread and thought it was the metal not the action to lead.

You can learn alot from children's Christmas shows, I wonder what I will learn tonight.
 
#7
Re: Words that are spelled the same but....

read and read (pronounced red)

I will read a book

I have already read the book 12io4j2w90
 
#17
Re: Words that are spelled the same but....

pretty stupid when you think about it, why do so many words mean different things?

how did this even come about? who named all this stuff? would love to know the history behind it.

obviously one person started calling a tire a tire before anyone else right?

was he tired when he came up with the word? being tired was around before a tire ;) because there were no tires???

hmmm
 
#22
Re: Words that are spelled the same but....

  • Homographs are words that share the same spelling regardless of how they are pronounced. Homographs may be pronounced the same, in which case they are also homophones – for example, bark (the sound of a dog) and bark (the skin of a tree). Alternatively they may be pronounced differently, in which case they are also heteronyms – for example, row (argument) and row (propel with oars). ("Homograph" also has a specialised meaning in typography, where it may be used as a synonym for homoglyph.)

  • Homophones are words that share the same pronunciation regardless of how they are spelled. Homophones may be spelled the same (in which case they are also homographs) or spelled differently (in which case they are heterographs). Homographic examples include tire (to become weary) and tire (on the wheel of a car). Heterographic examples include to, too, two, and there, their, they’re.

  • Heteronyms can be seen as the subclass of homographs (words that share the same spelling) that have different pronunciations. That is, they are homographs which are not homophones. This means words that are spelled the same but with different pronunciations (and meanings). Such words include desert (to abandon) and desert (arid region); row (to argue or an argument) and row (as in to row a boat or a row of seats). Note that the latter meaning also constitutes a homophone. Heteronyms are also sometimes called heterophones. ("Heteronym" also has a specialized meaning in poetry; see Heteronym (literature).)

  • Homonyms can be seen as the subclass of homophones that are spelled the same, which is logically the same as the subclass of homographs that are pronounced the same. This means words that are spelled and pronounced the same (but have different meanings).

  • Polysemes are words with the same spelling and distinct but related meanings. The distinction between polysemy and homonymy is often subtle and subjective, and not all sources consider polysemous words to be homonyms. Words such as "mouth", meaning either the orifice on one's face, or the opening of a cave or river, are polysemous and may or may not be considered homonyms.

  • Capitonyms are words that share the same spelling but have different meanings when capitalized (and may or may not have different pronunciations). Such words include polish (to make shiny) and Polish (from Poland).
 
#23
Re: Words that are spelled the same but....

homonym is one of a group of words that share the same pronunciation but have different meanings, and are usually spelled the same. Some sources only require that homonyms share the same spelling or pronunciation (in addition to having different meanings), but these are the definitions most other sources give for homographs and homophones respectively
 
#25
Re: Words that are spelled the same but....

Tons of football going on and Wilson has me wondering about the difference between a homonym and a homograph

Nice job Wilson :devil:
 
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