Illinois is voting today on sports gambling

FairWarning

Bells Beer Connoisseur
#1
Can’t wait to see which Democrat from the Chicago-area messes this up.

Ex-Raider Napoleon Harris high up on the list.
 
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#3
If it's going to happen this year, it has to happen today.

There was some hope as of a couple hours ago.
 
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O'Royken

EOG Dedicated
#7
They just extended the work week to include Saturday and Sunday.

Two more days.

Looks promising now.
 
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FairWarning

Bells Beer Connoisseur
#10
Typical shitshow in the Land of Lincoln. As of now, no Illinois colleges games will be offered.

Joe Ostrowski on Twitter is the guy to follow.
 
#15
https://www.legalsportsreport.com/33131/illinois-sports-betting-last-day-2019/

The exhaustive effort to legalize sports betting before adjournment is in overtime in Illinois.
Friday was frantic in the state capitol, with a myriad of key issues to hammer out on the last day of the scheduled session. Lawmakers did make a dent in the pile of bills, but leaders were forced to issue a bad-news bulletin extending the work week through Sunday.
Although sports betting remains unresolved, a substantial effort has materialized.
Rep. Robert Rita grabbed the reins on Friday, borrowing from the framework of Rep. Mike Zalewski to cobble together a compromise bill. His effort ran out of daylight on the House floor, but the bonus weekend of lawmaking means there’s still hope for IL sports betting this year.
While there is some momentum, failure to cast a vote on Friday makes the task a little bit taller. Any bills considered from here on out require a 3/5ths supermajority to pass, a threshold that may simply be out of reach.
 
#23
The plan also allows for a long-awaited casino to be built in Chicago. While language provides that such a casino must be privately-owned, a task force would examine whether the city could own it sometime in the future.



Chicago’s sports arenas could also pay $10 million to set up a sports betting parlor within the arenas themselves or within a five-block radius. While the bill allows official league data to be used for sports betting, it does not give any royalties to the leagues.

The state’s race tracks would also be allowed to install slot machines and more, turning them into “racinos.”
 

Valuist

EOG Dedicated
#25
The plan also allows for a long-awaited casino to be built in Chicago. While language provides that such a casino must be privately-owned, a task force would examine whether the city could own it sometime in the future.



Chicago’s sports arenas could also pay $10 million to set up a sports betting parlor within the arenas themselves or within a five-block radius. While the bill allows official league data to be used for sports betting, it does not give any royalties to the leagues.

The state’s race tracks would also be allowed to install slot machines and more, turning them into “racinos.”
I wonder how well a casino would do within the city limits. Rivers is right on the edge of the NW side, near O'Hare. And the Horseshoe in Hammond is literally blocks from the state line and the SE border of Chicago. Sure, it would siphon some customers from those venues, but really doubt any new customers would be created. If one lives if Chicago and wants to go to a casino, there's already options not far away.
 

FairWarning

Bells Beer Connoisseur
#26
I wonder how well a casino would do within the city limits. Rivers is right on the edge of the NW side, near O'Hare. And the Horseshoe in Hammond is literally blocks from the state line and the SE border of Chicago. Sure, it would siphon some customers from those venues, but really doubt any new customers would be created. If one lives if Chicago and wants to go to a casino, there's already options not far away.
I think this would go after the business traveler and the people working in the Loop. It would affect the Rivers more than the Horseshoe. One other casino it may affect a little is Four Winds in New Buffalo as people could view the downtown casino as a staycation vs going to Michigan.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#27
The plan also allows for a long-awaited casino to be built in Chicago. While language provides that such a casino must be privately-owned, a task force would examine whether the city could own it sometime in the future.



Chicago’s sports arenas could also pay $10 million to set up a sports betting parlor within the arenas themselves or within a five-block radius. While the bill allows official league data to be used for sports betting, it does not give any royalties to the leagues.

The state’s race tracks would also be allowed to install slot machines and more, turning them into “racinos.”

If the sports leagues would set up a Matchbook-style market, they would eliminate any conflicts of interest and generate revenue based solely on total handle.

That's how they could profit from booking the games yet stay above the fray.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#30
One of the many beauties of sports betting is the customer base.

Unlike state lotteries, sports betting appeals to gamblers with plenty of discretionary income.
 

FairWarning

Bells Beer Connoisseur
#34
Meanwhile, Michigan went from being the first in the Midwest to having it drop the ball.

This time, it's not Harbaugh's fault.
 
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#36
In the Illinois bill, there is no action on Illinois colleges. I had heard that the AD's of most of these colleges put pressure on the state house reps.

Michigan is such a joke. I've written the potential sponsor of the bill (BrandtIden@house.mi.gov) twice, and have gotten zero reply. The Michigan legislature sucks. Nothing ever gets done, and when it does, it is usually rushed through with very little thought like a bat out of hell......it just happened with the auto insurance reform.
 

Valuist

EOG Dedicated
#37
In the Illinois bill, there is no action on Illinois colleges. I had heard that the AD's of most of these colleges put pressure on the state house reps.

Michigan is such a joke. I've written the potential sponsor of the bill (BrandtIden@house.mi.gov) twice, and have gotten zero reply. The Michigan legislature sucks. Nothing ever gets done, and when it does, it is usually rushed through with very little thought like a bat out of hell......it just happened with the auto insurance reform.
Just shows how stupid those colleges are. Won't let us bet your games? One can just drive about 2500 feet across the border to the Horseshoe, who WILL be taking sports bets in the near future.
 

ChiTownJoe

EOG Dedicated
#38
I saw this in my INBOX this morning......

But not everyone was so upbeat about the bill, most notably DraftKings CEO Jason Robins, since the bill doesn’t include any online licenses for online operators.

Jason Robins

@JasonDRobins

https://twitter.com/JasonDRobins/status/1135133318800912384

While it is good to see sports betting bills passed, excluding DraftKings and FanDuel is like passing a ride sharing bill that excludes Uber and Lyft. Very disappointing that Illinois customers will not have the best options available to them for 18 months.

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Only three operators will gain online licenses, which will be chosen by the Gaming Board and sold for $20 million each.
 

ejd_5277

EOG Dedicated
#39
Some bad blood toward DK and FD for what some Illinois politicians considered their open flouting of regulations making DFS illegal in the state.

This doesn't surprise me at all.
 
#40
I think Draft Kings and Fan Duel, once the 18 months have passed has to pay $20,000,000 to have their franchise registered with Illinois as well?
 
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