My Monday blog

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#1
Visit a golf course and meet the golf pro.

Go to a tennis club and consult the tennis pro.

Join a health club and chat with an array of attractive fitness instructors eager to offer tips on living a better life.

The above illustration is drawn to illustrate businesses providing customer education to promote a happy, healthy experience within their environs.

Unfortunately for gamblers, we rarely experience quality customer service, let alone basic customer education.

Worse yet, gambling operators are more interested in distraction than education.

It starts with casino chips, a wildly-profitable creation of the gaming industry.

Chips create a mental separation between the gambler and his hard-earned dollars.

Unlike coins, gaming chips are one standard size regardless of their value, a subtle piece of deception.

And if the house doesn't fool the customer by serpentine means, they do it more overtly.

Sexy cocktail waitresses are casino employees who not only offer free drinks to casino players, but they also divert a gambler's attention, whether intentionally or unintentionally, from the game at hand.

Reward programs, on the surface, appear to benefit a casino player with token rebates of their gambling action through complimentary food, drink or hotel accommodations.

However, player tracking cards also provide the house with a detailed scouting report on a gambler's strengths and weaknesses.

What's more, the concept of earning reward points sometimes influences confused gamblers to accumulate points rather than profits.

Sports bettors also fall prey to making poor choices.

Betting options from a perilous menu offered by cunning operators are made available to entice gamblers who desire to bet a little to win a lot (parlays), lack confidence in their handicapping ability (teasers) or crave constant action (in-game wagering).

These alternatives cause gamblers to select betting pools with higher hold percentages than the traditional 4.54% available with straight-bet pricing of 11/10.

Howard Schwartz, former marketing director at Gambler's Book Club, once provided insight on the casino industry's view of customer education when asked about his store location in downtown Las Vegas at 630 South 11th Street.

Schwartz said, "We researched a retail location inside a Strip casino but the rent was expensive and the casino expressed little or no interest in educating losing gamblers. And I don't blame them."

Joe Lupo, one-time Director of Race and Sports Book Operations at the Stardust Hotel and Casino, delivered a funny response about educating his customer base.

He reacted to questions about housing a library inside the sports book where scores, stats and injury reports were supplied by a company called Computer Sports World.

Lupo claimed, "If sports bettors use the information posted in the Stardust Sports Handicappers' Library to beat us, then more power to them."

He then cracked, "Besides, we keep the good stuff in the back."

With Major League Baseball's All-Star Game upon us, let's ask 10 questions to a sports bettor with all the answers, the type of bettor who ideally would be employed by a sports book to man an information desk.

1) To gauge a team's performance during intermission of the 2019 MLB season, should a handicapper compare a team's projected number of victories to the regular-season win total at the beginning of the season OR track the units won or units lost versus the daily betting market?

2) Which MLB team wins more often, the team that scores the first run of the game or the team that scores the last run of the game?

3) True or False: The single most important factor in handicapping a baseball game is the historical performance of today's starting lineup against today's starting pitcher.

4) Discuss the following weather conditions and their impact on MLB scoring: Temperature, humidity, wind, precipitation and barometric pressure.

5) In this age of swing-and-miss baseball, should we assign a greater value for a pitcher who records a called-third strikeout rather than a swinging strikeout?

6) Which pitching stat is more significant: A pitcher's career performance against today's opponent or a pitcher's historical performance at today's site?

7) Are there ways to identify pitchers or position players who are struggling with drug addictions or steroid abuse?

8) What's the best piece of available information to judge the tendencies of home-plate umpires?

9) A popular baseball axiom says to forget what happened yesterday and ignore what took place last season. How much truth lies in that old saw?

10) If given only one choice, would you bet against MLB opening numbers or MLB closing numbers?

Next month, I return home to the States where I plan to visit a sharp sports bettor who usually provides answers to all my questions.

He's a wizard at math, logic, probability and problem-solving with a special feel for the sporting world.

Everyone should have a friend like EOG ombudsman ComptrBob.
 
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#2
10 difficult questions...have to believe that there are no wrong answers and some questions that could be debated....would love to hear those questions answered by ComptrBobr...
 
#4
Can you explain how Las Vegas tracking cards would be of detriment to the player?
 
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MrTop

EOG Master
#5
Lupo when at the stardust has good MLB lines.

he is one of the top people at hard rock in NJ , maybe has nothing to do with the sportsbook , but the lines are horrible for MLB
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#6
Can you explain how Las Vegas tracking cards would be of detriment to the player?

At the MGM Grand sports book, there are player tracking cards with no rewards program for race and sports bettors.

When a supervisor was asked why a player would sign up for the card, he responded, "If ever you lose a ticket, we will be able to locate it a lot faster."

The house could use your tracking card to make sure you don't exceed the $10,000 daily limit or possibly track your play to shade their numbers in a niche sport like the CFL or WNBA.

The casino might also use the cards to gauge the gambling IQ of a given player by reviewing the games or machines he or she is playing.

A high-stakes gambler with a low IQ would be a welcome guest at all Las Vegas casinos.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#7
Lupo when at the stardust has good MLB lines.

he is one of the top people at hard rock in NJ , maybe has nothing to do with the sportsbook , but the lines are horrible for MLB

Lupo is president of the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City.
 

Foresthill

EOG Enthusiast
#8
At the MGM Grand sports book, there are player tracking cards with no rewards program for race and sports bettors.

When a supervisor was asked why a player would sign up for the card, he responded, "If ever you lose a ticket, we will be able to locate it a lot faster."

The house could use your tracking card to make sure you don't exceed the $10,000 daily limit or possibly track your play to shade their numbers in a niche sport like the CFL or WNBA.

The casino might also use the cards to gauge the gambling IQ of a given player by reviewing the games or machines he or she is playing.

A high-stakes gambler with a low IQ would be a welcome guest at all Las Vegas casinos.
The casinos also like the aggregate information that the player cards provide them for how their average customer gambles. I would suggest that they gear their "marketing" and promotions accordingly.

In terms of sports books, doesn't William Hill use their tracking cards to bar "winning" sports bettors?
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#9
Good point, Foresthill.

You need a William Hill card in Las Vegas or Reno to make a $1,000 wager, or $500 if they so desire.

Ridiculous.

Micromanagers.

And if the dime bettor gets on a one-week hot streak, the player is informed their action is no longer wanted.

Hilarious.
 
#12
Good point, Foresthill.

You need a William Hill card in Las Vegas or Reno to make a $1,000 wager, or $500 if they so desire.

Ridiculous.

Micromanagers.

And if the dime bettor gets on a one-week hot streak, the player is informed their action is no longer wanted.

Hilarious.
Never did I ever expect to live and see spotsbooks kick out players...goes to show that these books don’t have enough qualified employees....I was taught that there will be winners....you just have to identify them and use them to your advantage....and don’t be afraid to move a line....shame on William Hill and others...
 
#13
I like your take with the casino chips.

A bigger move was when casino slot machines went from entering coins and getting coins back to entering coins and getting a paper slip with an amount on it. How many of those slips are lost on a daily basis or simply aren't cashed when an amount is under a dollar.

Interesting note....if you find those tickets somewhere and you aren't the original originator of that ticket and you try to cash it you could get a ban from that casino.

I'm seeing more and more casinos having the machine like blackjack tables. Players see numbers...not chips which is another level of removing the player from the idea that money is actually being gambled.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
#15
I like your take with the casino chips.

A bigger move was when casino slot machines went from entering coins and getting coins back to entering coins and getting a paper slip with an amount on it. How many of those slips are lost on a daily basis or simply aren't cashed when an amount is under a dollar.

Interesting note....if you find those tickets somewhere and you aren't the original originator of that ticket and you try to cash it you could get a ban from that casino.

I'm seeing more and more casinos having the machine like blackjack tables. Players see numbers...not chips which is another level of removing the player from the idea that money is actually being gambled.

EOG Squarepants recently used the word "distorting" to describe the Las Vegas experience.

How true.
 
Top