The No-Cash Bears

Rockfish

EOG Addicted
Starting with this Sunday's Bear game at Soldier Field, they will not accept cash for anything in the stadium.

Is this the norm at stadiums these days?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
Cashless society, that's where we're headed.

Went to Wintrust Arena in downtown Chicago the other day for a WNBA game.

Stood in a line of 10 people (yours truly and nine women, none of whom were interested in me) at the souvenir stand.

Was going to purchase a Chicago Sky t-shirt as a gift for $30.

Got to the front of the line and had $30 cash in my hand.

"No cash," said the clerk.

"Then no sale," I said, shaking my head in disgust.

Terrible policy, I thought.

Upon further review, no one was complaining about the policy.

Everyone was paying with their debit/credit cards.

My cards were in my backpack located in hotel room.

Lesson learned.

Need to adjust.
 
Last edited:

MrTop

EOG Master
underground money is a target.


forget paypal , venmo etc


they want what is inside the tip jar at the pizza joints soon
 

Heim

EOG Master
I'm still not accustomed to going to a Angel game and having to pull up my ticket code
on my phone for them to scan for entrance.
 

Valuist

EOG Master
I posted about this earlier in the week. It's not just Soldier Field. The govt wants to be able to track ALL of your purchases.

1662673223030.png
 

MrTop

EOG Master
Chicago Bears Chairman George McCaskey kicked off opening day of the National Football League’s season Thursday by pitching a new stadium and entertainment district to residents in the Windy city’s Northwest suburbs as the team explores possibly leaving Soldier Field.

The team has already agreed to buy a 326-acre property in Arlington Heights, Illinois, that was the site of a horse racecourse owned by Churchill Downs Inc. The deal has yet to close but the agreement has spurred intense debate about the future home of the Bears, who have played at Chicago’s Soldier Field for half a century.
McCaskey told hundreds gathered in a suburban high school gym Thursday that the proposal could bring millions of dollars in economic activity year round to the town, region and state. Still, there is no guarantee it will develop the land even if the deal closes, he said. Also, during the time the team is under contract to buy the property, it will not explore other options including renovations to Soldier Field, which city officials have proposed.
“We are at the very beginning of a process to explore what might be possible at the Arlington Park site. There are still many unknowns,” McCaskey said. “We think development of the site including a stadium is a win for Bears fans, the village of Arlington Heights, the surrounding communities and the state of Illinois.”
Construction of the domed stadium and surrounding complex could create more than 48,000 jobs with $9.4 billion in economic impact for the region, according to the team. The development may generate $16 million in annual tax revenue in addition to property taxes for Arlington Heights, $9.8 million for Cook County and $51.3 million for the state, the team estimates.

The economic benefits from a new stadium project are often inflated and it’s certainly a risk for Arlington Heights, betting that people will come to the development around the arena even when the Bears aren’t playing, said Victor Matheson, an economist at the College of the Holy Cross who specializes in sports and stadium financing.
“It’s a tremendous gamble,” he said, because NFL stadiums are not used regularly as the team plays only a handful of home games a year and would be competing for concerts and other events with Solider Field which is more central to the city.

The Bears will not seek public funding for construction of the stadium but may seek local dollars for infrastructure such as roads for the broader complex, McCaskey said.

The assurance comes amid national debate about the use of taxpayer dollars to pay for stadiums owned by private owners. Soldier Field is owned by the Chicago Park District.
Recently, the Philadelphia 76ers basketball team promised the use of private financing instead of taxpayer dollars to build an arena. The $5.5 billion SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles was entirely privately financed and the Oakland Athletics have said they would foot the cost for their new ballpark, though the city may provide funds for related infrastructure.
“A tremendous opportunity is present today but we will need help to make it a reality,” said McCaskey, who added the search for a home specific to the Bears started with his grandfather and the team’s founder George Halas.

bloomberg
 

boston massacre

EOG Dedicated
Chicago Bears Chairman George McCaskey kicked off opening day of the National Football League’s season Thursday by pitching a new stadium and entertainment district to residents in the Windy city’s Northwest suburbs as the team explores possibly leaving Soldier Field.

The team has already agreed to buy a 326-acre property in Arlington Heights, Illinois, that was the site of a horse racecourse owned by Churchill Downs Inc. The deal has yet to close but the agreement has spurred intense debate about the future home of the Bears, who have played at Chicago’s Soldier Field for half a century.
McCaskey told hundreds gathered in a suburban high school gym Thursday that the proposal could bring millions of dollars in economic activity year round to the town, region and state. Still, there is no guarantee it will develop the land even if the deal closes, he said. Also, during the time the team is under contract to buy the property, it will not explore other options including renovations to Soldier Field, which city officials have proposed.
“We are at the very beginning of a process to explore what might be possible at the Arlington Park site. There are still many unknowns,” McCaskey said. “We think development of the site including a stadium is a win for Bears fans, the village of Arlington Heights, the surrounding communities and the state of Illinois.”
Construction of the domed stadium and surrounding complex could create more than 48,000 jobs with $9.4 billion in economic impact for the region, according to the team. The development may generate $16 million in annual tax revenue in addition to property taxes for Arlington Heights, $9.8 million for Cook County and $51.3 million for the state, the team estimates.

The economic benefits from a new stadium project are often inflated and it’s certainly a risk for Arlington Heights, betting that people will come to the development around the arena even when the Bears aren’t playing, said Victor Matheson, an economist at the College of the Holy Cross who specializes in sports and stadium financing.
“It’s a tremendous gamble,” he said, because NFL stadiums are not used regularly as the team plays only a handful of home games a year and would be competing for concerts and other events with Solider Field which is more central to the city.

The Bears will not seek public funding for construction of the stadium but may seek local dollars for infrastructure such as roads for the broader complex, McCaskey said.

The assurance comes amid national debate about the use of taxpayer dollars to pay for stadiums owned by private owners. Soldier Field is owned by the Chicago Park District.
Recently, the Philadelphia 76ers basketball team promised the use of private financing instead of taxpayer dollars to build an arena. The $5.5 billion SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles was entirely privately financed and the Oakland Athletics have said they would foot the cost for their new ballpark, though the city may provide funds for related infrastructure.
“A tremendous opportunity is present today but we will need help to make it a reality,” said McCaskey, who added the search for a home specific to the Bears started with his grandfather and the team’s founder George Halas.

bloomberg


 

railbird

EOG Master
Also it causes all, both small and great, both rich and poor, both free and slave, to be marked on the right hand or the forehead, so that no one can buy or sell unless he has the mark, that is, the name of the beast or the number of its name. This calls for wisdom: let the one who has understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man, and his number is 666.
 

railbird

EOG Master
most these cashless stadiums do take cash, you just give it to the doorman instead of the box office
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
At Hawthorne these days, you need to produce an i.d. to enter the PointsBet sports book area.

And then they want to stamp your hand if you want to go in and out.

No thanks.

I'll produce my i.d. every time.
 

Rockfish

EOG Addicted
At Hawthorne these days, you need to produce an i.d. to enter the PointsBet sports book area.

And then they want to stamp your hand if you want to go in and out.

No thanks.

I'll produce my i.d. every time.
Hawthorne. How is that Casino and Hotel construction going. LOL! That ownership has always been a total joke. Always done things on the cheap. Amazing how they are the only ones left in Chicago.

If someone 15 years ago asked me to give them odds that Hawthorne would be the only one left standing. i would have said 10,000 to 1. Yet here we are.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
Ha Ha! Back in the day the regulars knew which Andy Frain guys didn't care if your hand was stamped or not. just throw your hand real quick under the black light and act like you belong. Saved a buck. Felt like you just had a winner.

I served as an Andy Frain usher during my high school years.

Got paid to watch sporting events.

Granted, I was only making $3.65 an hour, but I was 16 or 17 in the late 1970s.

Still have my Andy Frain hat.
 

blueline

EOG Master
Did the quick hand move under the light....also when meeting friends one would pay for the clubhouse...get the stamp and then press hands together to transfer the stamp to the others
 

Rockfish

EOG Addicted
It's Super Night at Hawthorne tonight.
Went a few years back. They had a bunch of old time drivers for the people to meet. i talked to Kim Hankins and Randy Jacobs. i knew them a little when i was on the backstretch in the early to mid 80's.
Was going to go tonight but something else came up so can't make it.
 

Rockfish

EOG Addicted
Would love to see a picture of JK in his Andy Frain uniform. Did Frain have any rules back then about appearance? Like no long hair?
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
Would love to see a picture of JK in his Andy Frain uniform. Did Frain have any rules back then about appearance? Like no long hair?

Hmmm...

I faintly remember a restriction on long hair.

Andy Frain, Inc. had a lot of rules and restrictions for employees who earned $3.35 an hour in 1979.
 
Last edited:

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
But I loved when my Andy Frain two-week worksheet arrived in the mail with a Sportsman's Park assignment on it.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
Justin Fields looked "squirrely" in the pocket last night.

Not good.

How do you throw only 11 passes in a game when you trailed by two scores for a majority of the game?

I knew Chicago head coach Matt Eberflus was conservative, but I didn't know he was that conservative.
 

John Kelly

Born Gambler
Staff member
Went a few years back. They had a bunch of old time drivers for the people to meet. i talked to Kim Hankins and Randy Jacobs. i knew them a little when i was on the backstretch in the early to mid 80's.
Was going to go tonight but something else came up so can't make it.

Your role on the backstretch, ROCK?
 
Top