Your Level of Concern About the Coronavirus......on a scale of 1-10

One of the first deaths in Virginia from coronavirus was a 66-year-old Christian “musical evangelist” who fell ill while on a trip to New Orleans with his wife. As the Friendly Atheist’s Hemant Mehta points out, Landon Spradlin had previously shared opinions that the pandemic was the result of “mass hysteria” from the media.
On March 13, Spradlin shared a misleading meme that compared coronavirus deaths to swine flu deaths and suggested the media is using the pandemic to hurt Trump. In the comments, Spradlin acknowledged that the outbreak is a “real issue,” but added that he believes “the media is pumping out fear and doing more harm than good”
 
I love some of the comments

"That's great. So now people from High Risk counties can just go to the Low Risk ones and be safe "

"Classifying various areas of the country as "Low-Risk" for the Coronavirus by Easter is all a part of the Trump Administration's brilliant plan to make the entire country "High-Risk" by Summer "
Many area's just dont have the population or the expected infection rate to ever get overwhelmed , that's why they dont need to practice extreme mitigation.

These lockdowns and shutdowns will not cut the total number of infections, they only spread it out, some areas dont need to spread it out. it's really not complicated.
 
Many area's just dont have the population or the expected infection rate to ever get overwhelmed , that's why they dont need to practice extreme mitigation.

These lockdowns and shutdowns will not cut the total number of infections, they only spread it out, some areas dont need to spread it out. it's really not complicated.
Incorrect.

'overwhelmed' means different thing in different cities.

In NYC it means 10's of thousands of cases.

In rural Alabama it means 10's of cases (or even less)
 
Many area's just dont have the population or the expected infection rate to ever get overwhelmed , that's why they dont need to practice extreme mitigation.

These lockdowns and shutdowns will not cut the total number of infections, they only spread it out, some areas dont need to spread it out. it's really not complicated.

spread out places have less doctors and hospitals in reach per capita.

its actually quite the reverse its easier for many of them to get overwhelmed
 
Many small hospitals only have a single ventilator
More people in small towns means more responsibility for those healthcare systems, which are overburdened and underfunded as is, Alan Morgan, the CEO of the National Rural Health Association, told Business Insider.
A lot of small hospitals in rural areas have 25 or fewer inpatient beds, and most have only one ventilator. Many don't have intensive-care units at all, Nora Super, senior director at the Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging, told Business Insider.
 
spread out places have less doctors and hospitals in reach per capita.

its actually quite the reverse its easier for many of them to get overwhelmed
They dont have and will never have the same level of infections, they just wont, it's the nature of being spread out. The only people who are asking for nationwide shutdowns are people in areas who are locked down, it's a misery loves company mentality.
 
They dont have and will never have the same level of infections, they just wont, it's the nature of being spread out. The only people who are asking for nationwide shutdowns are people in areas who are locked down, it's a misery loves company mentality.
their resources are just too small for even a tiny percentage of uptick

I don't recall seeing anyone call for nationwide shut downs.
It should be rolled out on an as needed basis for various geographical areas with their unique issues
 
The ideal scenario is for continuous infections at a modest level, that's what would make everything end quicker and better, mitigation practices in areas with no or low infections accomplishes nothing at all, it's actually counterproductive.
 
I'm looking forward to images of small town areas with deputized posse's doing road blocks with armed members on lone highways leading into their towns.

I know i'd be doing that at some point
 
it was already too late

And it wasnt a full on ban either

And it didnt include American citizens or permanent residents of Chinese origin who went back to China to celebrate their new year
 
I'm looking forward to images of small town areas with deputized posse's doing road blocks with armed members on lone highways leading into their towns.

I know i'd be doing that at some point

but for many tourism based economies they will be stuck between a rock and a hard place. I'm not sure what the answer is

https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/cor...s-coronavirus-pandemic-erupts-cities/2261397/

To make matters worse, some of the most remote communities have limited or no internet access and spotty cellphone service. That makes telecommuting and online learning challenging in an era of blanket school and work closures, and it eliminates the possibility of the FaceTime card games and virtual cocktail hours that urban Americans have turned to in droves to stay connected.
The routine ways that rural Americans connect — a bingo night, stopping in at a local diner or attending a potluck — are suddenly taboo.
“Rural people are reliant on their neighbors and have more confidence and trust in their neighbors,” said Ken Johnson, a senior demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy and professor of sociology at the University of New Hampshire. “Now you have people who are supposed to self-isolate themselves. What does that mean when people you depend on, in order to help you, are going to put themselves and their families at risk? I don’t know what that will do in rural America.”
Neil Bradshaw, the mayor of Ketchum, Idaho, is starting to see the answer in his own community.
The rural resort town has struggled since the arrival of COVID-19, and he fears if the virus lingers too long, it could devastate it. The town is nestled next door to the tony skiing destination Sun Valley Resort and is known as the second-home haven for dozens of celebrities.

“Our town thrives on people coming to town, and for the first time in our history we are discouraging visitors,” said Bradshaw, of the town of 2,700 people. “Initially people had different levels of adoption, but there’s tremendous community pressure that we’re all in this together. We’ve gone from being a vibrant town to a ghost town.”
The town’s coffers rely on a local option tax, and if that drops by half the city will have lost $700,000 in revenue, he said.
Some communities have pushed back on shutdowns that have brought daily life to a standstill. Leaders from seven Utah counties, for example, sent a letter earlier this week to Gov. Gary Herbert urging a “return to normalcy,” and said the closure of schools and business was causing panic and hurting the economy.
"As of (Monday), the total deaths attributed to the virus in the United States stands at ninety,” the letter states. “Not nine hundred, not nine thousand, not ninety thousand. Ninety. This number is sure to rise in the near future but we need to keep our wits about us.”


Others worry about outsiders bringing the disease to truly remote areas that aren't equipped to deal with it. Across the nation, there are over 51,000 general intensive care beds in urban counties, compared with just 5,600 in rural counties, according to data compiled by The Associated Press.
Those beds serve a smaller population than in urban areas, but it would still take fewer people in rural areas to overwhelm a typical hospital. In fiscal year 2018, the average rural hospital had eight ICU beds, compared with 20 for a typical hospital in an urban area.
In Georgiana, a small town in southern Alabama, the only hospital closed last year, so residents flocked to the health clinic instead when a person in a town 5 miles (8 kilometers) away was diagnosed with COVID-19. More than 30% of Georgiana's 1,600 residents are over age 60, putting them at higher risk with limited medical facilities to serve them, said Mayor
Jerome Antone.
 
Timeline
December 31, 2019 - Cases of pneumonia detected in Wuhan, China, are first reported to the WHO. During this reported period, the virus is unknown. The cases occur between December 12 and December 29, according to Wuhan Municipal Health.
January 1, 2020 - Chinese health authorities close the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Marketafter it is discovered that wild animals sold there may be the source of the virus.
January 5, 2020 - China announces that the unknown pneumonia cases in Wuhan are not SARS or MERS. In a statement, the Wuhan Municipal Health Commission says a retrospective probe into the outbreak has been initiated.
January 7, 2020 - Chinese authorities confirm that they have identified the virus as a novel coronavirus, initially named 2019-nCoV by the WHO.
January 11, 2020 - The Wuhan Municipal Health Commission announces the first death caused by the coronavirus. A 61-year-old man, exposed to the virus at the seafood market, died on January 9 after respiratory failure caused by severe pneumonia.
January 13, 2020 - Thai authorities report a case of infection caused by the coronavirus. The infected individual is a Chinese national who had arrived from Wuhan.
January 16, 2020 - Japanese authorities confirm that a Japanese man who traveled to Wuhan is infected with the virus.
January 17, 2020 - Chinese health officials confirm that a second person has died in China. The United States responds to the outbreak by implementing screenings for symptoms atairports in San Francisco, New York and Los Angeles.
January 20, 2020 - China reports 139 new cases of the sickness, including a third death.
January 20, 2020 - The National Institutes of Health announces that it is working on a vaccine against the coronavirus. "The NIH is in the process of taking the first steps towards the development of a vaccine," says Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
January 21, 2020 - Officials in Washington state confirm the first case on US soil.
January 22, 2020 - Wuhan says it will "temporarily" close its airport and railway stations for departing passengers following news that the death toll from the Wuhan Coronavirus has risen to 17. Chinese authorities confirm at least 547 cases in the mainland.
January 23, 2020 - At an emergency committee convened by the World Health Organization,the WHO says that the Wuhan coronavirus does not yet constitute a public health emergency of international concern.
January 23, 2020 - The Beijing Culture and Tourism Bureau cancels all large-scale Lunar New Year celebrations in an effort to contain the growing spread of Wuhan coronavirus. On the same day, Chinese authorities enforce a partial lockdown of transport in and out of Wuhan. Authorities in the nearby cities of Huanggang and Ezhou Huanggang announce a series of similar measures.
January 26, 2020 - The China Association of Travel Services reports that all tours, including international ones, will be suspended.
January 28, 2020 - Chinese President Xi Jinping meets with WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom in Beijing. At the meeting, Xi and the WHO agree to send a team of international experts, including US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff, to China to investigate the coronavirus outbreak.
January 29, 2020 - The White House announces the formation of a new task force that will help monitor and contain the spread of the virus, and ensure Americans have accurate and up-to-date health and travel information, it says.
January 30, 2020 - The United States reports its first confirmed case of person-to-person transmission of the Wuhan coronavirus. On the same day, the WHO determines that the outbreak constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC).
January 31, 2020 - The Donald Trump administration announces it will deny entry to foreign nationals who have traveled in China in the last 14 days.
 
I'm looking forward to images of small town areas with deputized posse's doing road blocks with armed members on lone highways leading into their towns.

I know i'd be doing that at some point
What point are you trying to make? this pandemic will likely peak from very late april to early june, the death rate from it(barring new treatments) is fixed, peddling in fear, second guessing the past, isn't going to change what's going to happen, except to make it worse.
 
What point are you trying to make? this pandemic will likely peak from very late april to early june, the death rate from it(barring new treatments) is fixed, peddling in fear, second guessing the past, isn't going to change what's going to happen, except to make it worse.
The death rate is only fixed if the treatable ones would be treated.

If hospitals overflow, you will have to recalculate
 
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